Deuce Jack Safety Questions

TMNT

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I'm pretty sure I looked in the tm and the center of the diff is a lift point on a Rockwell axle. Don't quote me on it, I cannot access the tm's on my cell phone and do not have a computer handy.

I found this in the 9-2320-209-20-3-1. Its not a bottle jack, so the foot print of the lift point is bigger/better for this application:

Capture 2.JPG
 

dezert ratt

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menifee, ca
A jack point is a jack point. The drain plug is protected by the bung surrounding it. I've lifted my 5ton numerous times, even questioning picking it up there and have yet to see any type of fatigue on the diff.
On another note, that cribbing looks interesting in the picture haha.
 

TMNT

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The problem I have is with my 20 ton bottle jack and 12 ton jackstands there's no room to jack up one side and fit a jackstand in there.
I have the same problem. I fully understand Tigger's concerns and now I'm worried about breaking my diff housing. I have on many occasions, lifted the truck with a 20-ton bottle jack under the diff. I use (again I understand Tigger's concern and I'm re-thinking my method) a block of hard wood between the jack and the bottom of the diff. Yes, the block can split, yes I can see how the drain plug could be damaged, yes I can understand the jack-hammer effect of the air-powered bottle jacks. I've never had a problem, but that doesn't mean it can't happen.

There is enough room on the steer axle to lift on the axle tube and still get a 12-ton jack stand in there. The biggest issue for me is the middle axle. There is just not enough room to get the jack in there and a jack stand if you lift between the diff housing and the wheel. Plus, when you lift a rear axle, you're not really lifting weight of the truck. You're just over-coming the resistance of the springs and transferring weight to the other axle, right? I mean, I don't know how much weight that actually represents, but I know its a lot lighter/easier than lifting the front axle, even with a bed full of whatever. Still searching and thinking............
 

TMNT

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A jack point is a jack point. The drain plug is protected by the bung surrounding it. I've lifted my 5ton numerous times, even questioning picking it up there and have yet to see any type of fatigue on the diff.
On another note, that cribbing looks interesting in the picture haha.
My thinking exactly on the lift point, prior to this thread and reading Tigger's advice (PC for losing a freakin' screw). I don't want to damage the diff.

So, my previous logic was:

A) I'm certain that I've seen numerous places in the TM's where the lift point was the diff housing. I'm still re-checking that.

B) When you're off-road and manage to get the diff on the ground hard enough to carry the front tires, it doesn't damage the diff. It seems to tolerate that kind of abuse just fine. I figured if it can take that, surely lifting it with a jack wouldn't hurt it.

Still thinking....
 

dezert ratt

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menifee, ca
We're not dealing with cast metal center sections like on regular vehicles. Someone show me a Rockwell with a damaged diff pan from jacking. They are built pretty stout to be the lowest point on these trucks and the first thing to contact terra firma after the tires.
 

jeremymx26

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I have used a jack on the center section of axles for over 15 years now. Granted the heaviest truck that I see coming through the shop is a 1 ton diesel. I have never seen or heard of any damage to a differential housing. I say follow the TMs accordingly,but do not badger another member unless it is a safety concern. There is more than one way to skin a cat.
 

TMNT

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I appreciate all comments and I have no intention to badger anyone, especially Tigger. He obviously has significant experience with this type of thing and I value his opinion.
So much so, that I'm re-thinking the way I jack up my truck in consideration of his comments.

My comment about him "losing a screw" was made in jest due to his.....um......enthusiastic comments.

I've never heard of gringeltaube's method of using cardboard as a pad between the jack and the lifting point. I'll give that a try.
 

UPFINN

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Well looking through the TMs and diagrams posted here, it seems the bottle jack is best placed near the U-bolts/suspension mounts. I have not found mentions of jack stands in the manual. Perhaps there was not enough room to take them and they used cribbing instead. I take it a floor jack can be used on the diff due to the bigger surface area.

The TMs never called for using a air activated bottle jack. I guess the standard practice in the military was to just crawl under to jack the middle axle and make sure to chock those tires!
 

UPFINN

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It's also not a bad idea to have a piece of rubber to put between the jack and the axle to help prevent slipping.
Conveyor belt might work. I tried to cut up some 3/8 belt to put over some compost bins and the stuff laughed at every power tool I threw at it. Went through a jigsaw, sawzall, circular saw, chainsaw, and tin snips. :deadhorse:Ended up using a straight edge and a sharp razor knife. Took awhile but I got it. Conveyor belt has a lot of fiber/fabric reinforcement.
 

John S-B

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The problem I have is with my 20 ton bottle jack and 12 ton jackstands there's no room to jack up one side and fit a jackstand in there.
Use a smaller bottle jack and jack stands. The total weight of an empty deuce is only 13,500 or so. You likely won't be lifting half of that unless you're loaded, even then you're okay. Higher capacity is nice if it fits, but you're way over what you need. I use an 8 ton jack and 6 ton jack stands for my deuce.

I also use a 6X6 under the bottle jack since it's a wider base, and I don't have to extend the jack very far= more stability.
 

dezert ratt

Member
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Location
menifee, ca
I haven't had my deuce jacked up yet.
My 5 ton on the other hand, I regularly am doing maintenence on the brake system and bearings. The 5 ton empty is over 20k lbs.
I'm wondering since I don't have a big floor jack, will the base touch the diff pan or does the center of the base hit the oil drain plug bung first?
 
Last edited:

Wolfgang the Gray

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New River, AZ
This looks to be the jack pictured and should fit in a deuce tool box depending on how much other stuff you have in it. Click on the jack specs for size. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Big-Red-20-Ton-Air-Hydraulic-Bottle-Jack-TA92006/100595082
Sorry, I should have been clearer in my initial question. Let me rephrase the question. Can you tell me how big the tool box on the deuce is? I already looked up the dimensions of the jack, but don't know the dimensions of the tool box interior.
 

John S-B

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Sorry, I should have been clearer in my initial question. Let me rephrase the question. Can you tell me how big the tool box on the deuce is? I already looked up the dimensions of the jack, but don't know the dimensions of the tool box interior.
I don't know of any bottle or hydraulic type jack other than what you'd lift a railroad car that won't fit in the tool box on a deuce. Even a 50 ton jack should fit.
 
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