How do you secure your vehicle at shows? Armor hatches - Safety related

81turbota

Member
14
35
13
Location
CA
Hello everyone,

My Ferret is almost road worthy and will attend local car shows. We get an occasional GPW or WC truck but it’s rare…usually 60’s classics and modern exotics. A military vehicle will attract all kinds of attention both good and bad.

My main concern is securing the hatches in a way a kid or bright adult won’t lose a finger climbing/pulling on things. As much as we like to think people won’t touch…they will. The simple answer is to display it buttoned up, but I’d like people to see the interior, engine bay etc.

Turret is fairly straightforward the top has a lock pin the rear sits down via gravity. Front driver hatch secured by wing nuts. Engine cover I’m going to make a link with quick release pins to keep it open using the padlock tabs.

Any idea on the driver’s side and rear hatches? Pushing on the exposed mechanism from the exterior will cause them to shut full force. I can lock them closed but don’t see a way to quickly idiot proof them for show purposes. I’m contemplating a split tube with a hinge and wing nut to encase the pivot mechanism but that’s a bit more tedious than I’d like.

I would also love to hear any other general safety precautions you take with your MVs leaving them in close proximity with the general public.

Thanks!
 

mgFray

Well-known member
379
515
93
Location
Southern Minnesota
HMMWV so a bit different, but back 24 years ago my kid ( 2 at the time ) crawled into an Army HMMWV and started it. That reserve unit learned really quickly to unhook the battery when showing a HMMWV where someone can reach the start switch!

in my more modern case, I tend to put wheel chalks on. That way if someone “bumps” the parking brake it won’t roll.
 

SCSG-G4

PSVB 3003
Steel Soldiers Supporter
5,135
2,581
113
Location
Lexington, South Carolina
I stand by my vehicle at shows and let people in the cab (deuce) one at the time to have their picture taken. Even have a short ladder to the kids to climb up and down. If I need to do something else (get food, use 'facilities', etc.) the ladder goes between the seat and the steering wheel and the passenger door is locked from the inside. YMMV.
 

BEASTMASTER

Active member
884
101
43
Location
Burgaw, N.C.
on my 5 ton the kids used to love stomping on the pedals, and playing with the directionaals so i;d clamp vice-grips on the pedals at the floor and stuff a spra paint can under the throttle pedal and take the dir. switch off. oh and disconnect the batts, and cholck the wheels for sure. and zip tie the glove box so they can't get it open .
 

Buck Wampum

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
50
85
18
Location
SE PA
I use wheel chocks (always) in case someone does get in and releases the brake/shifts into neutral. I put a "Danger do not touch" sign by the 24V battery compartment. Put do not touch signs on all 4 sides of vehicle. The goal here is to court-proof yourself. If someone does do something stupid, they can't say they weren't warned. And get ready to have people pawing at your vehicle all day long. The same people who would never touch a car at a car show immediately run up and put their oily handprints all over mine. They also knock on the hull (I guess they think it's not made of armor?). I'd say fully half the people who come up to look at my vehicle end up touching it.

If you want to let someone get in, be prepared to be like the guy running a carnival ride for the rest of the day, putting kids in and out of the vehicle. I made the mistake of letting a neighbor put his kid in my vehicle. Instantly I had 4 or 5 families lined up and all the kids wanted in. The V-100 (and I expect the Ferret) is not a kid-friendly vehicle. Lots of sharp edges, poke hazards and irreplaceable parts. I let Vietnam vets into it, but that's about it.
 

M813rc

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
3,728
1,372
113
Location
Near Austin, Texas
I flat out don't let people in the V100. I have scars on my head from banging into fixtures in there while working on it, so it is not "safe", and besides that I don't want them coonfingering my stuff inside (like radios and other gear).
I lock the right side and rear hatches from inside, and only allow supervised looking in the left side hatch. If I have to take a break and step away from the vehicle, and don't have someone to relieve me, I close and latch the lower half of the side door, and have a piece of plexiglass with metal tabs that slips under the hinge side of the door, and a slot that fits over the padlock tab on the other side. I can padlock that in place, it covers the whole opening, folks can still look in but can't reach inside. If I am going to be out of sight of the V, I go ahead and close and padlock the side hatch.

With the big trucks I only allow one kid at a time to get in the driver's seat, and only if their parents are there to approve and supervise them getting in and out. And I'm not bashful about telling them to get out if they start acting like a monkey on a rock. With the M931, I drain the air tanks, which locks the brakes, and unhook the battery dogbone so it can't be "accidentally" started. With the tanks drained, they can't blow the air horn either!

Having vicarious knowledge of Ferret Finger, if I were displaying one, I'd have to close those hatches. The bite can be rather severe. Just not worth the risk.

Cheers
 

kendelrio

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
2,199
5,796
113
Location
Alexandria, La
I understand all of the concerns regarding the hatches etc on the V 100s and Ferrets.

That said, when I bring my 5 ton to a show, I encourage the kids to get in it and check it out. Mind you, I don't just let them climb about willy nilly, but here's my thing:

When kids go to car shows, what are they told? "Don't touch ANYTHING, put your hands in your pockets!". They end up walking around miserable. Then they get to thos HUGE BLACK ARMY TRUCK and not only are they allowed to touch it, they're allowed to climb in! I am usually exhausted from helping little ones up, taking pictures for families and answering questions.

99% of the kids I let in the truck are awed and a little overwhelmed sitting in the drivers seat, but the smiles on their faces is amazing.

And yes. I "kid proof" my truck. I drain the tanks, so the brakes lock, chock the wheels and I have a hidden master kill switch on the batteries.

In fact, my kill switch is so well hidden that at the last car show, several vets and active duty soldiers asked if they could drive it and I told them "If you can start it, you can drive it". All tried, all failed.

So while I understand the need to "court proof" your truck, remember, we are a dying breed. A lot of the younger generation have no understanding of our vehicles and or the history behind them. They also have no idea of the work we do to restore our beauties, so instead of being all "Get off my lawn" about my truck, I invite them onto the lawn and teach them how to respect it.

My two cents.
 

Mullaney

Well-known member
Supporting Vendor
6,146
15,030
113
Location
Charlotte NC
I understand all of the concerns regarding the hatches etc on the V 100s and Ferrets.

That said, when I bring my 5 ton to a show, I encourage the kids to get in it and check it out. Mind you, I don't just let them climb about willy nilly, but here's my thing:

When kids go to car shows, what are they told? "Don't touch ANYTHING, put your hands in your pockets!". They end up walking around miserable. Then they get to thos HUGE BLACK ARMY TRUCK and not only are they allowed to touch it, they're allowed to climb in! I am usually exhausted from helping little ones up, taking pictures for families and answering questions.

99% of the kids I let in the truck are awed and a little overwhelmed sitting in the drivers seat, but the smiles on their faces is amazing.

And yes. I "kid proof" my truck. I drain the tanks, so the brakes lock, chock the wheels and I have a hidden master kill switch on the batteries.

In fact, my kill switch is so well hidden that at the last car show, several vets and active duty soldiers asked if they could drive it and I told them "If you can start it, you can drive it". All tried, all failed.

So while I understand the need to "court proof" your truck, remember, we are a dying breed. A lot of the younger generation have no understanding of our vehicles and or the history behind them. They also have no idea of the work we do to restore our beauties, so instead of being all "Get off my lawn" about my truck, I invite them onto the lawn and teach them how to respect it.

My two cents.
.
Well said @kendelrio !

I do the same - and I definitely agree about being tired after a show. Lots of lifting and "standing in the way" as they climb back down. But the fun of doing it makes it all worth while for sure!
 

SCSG-G4

PSVB 3003
Steel Soldiers Supporter
5,135
2,581
113
Location
Lexington, South Carolina
I understand all of the concerns regarding the hatches etc on the V 100s and Ferrets.

That said, when I bring my 5 ton to a show, I encourage the kids to get in it and check it out. Mind you, I don't just let them climb about willy nilly, but here's my thing:

When kids go to car shows, what are they told? "Don't touch ANYTHING, put your hands in your pockets!". They end up walking around miserable. Then they get to thos HUGE BLACK ARMY TRUCK and not only are they allowed to touch it, they're allowed to climb in! I am usually exhausted from helping little ones up, taking pictures for families and answering questions.

99% of the kids I let in the truck are awed and a little overwhelmed sitting in the drivers seat, but the smiles on their faces is amazing.

And yes. I "kid proof" my truck. I drain the tanks, so the brakes lock, chock the wheels and I have a hidden master kill switch on the batteries.

In fact, my kill switch is so well hidden that at the last car show, several vets and active duty soldiers asked if they could drive it and I told them "If you can start it, you can drive it". All tried, all failed.

So while I understand the need to "court proof" your truck, remember, we are a dying breed. A lot of the younger generation have no understanding of our vehicles and or the history behind them. They also have no idea of the work we do to restore our beauties, so instead of being all "Get off my lawn" about my truck, I invite them onto the lawn and teach them how to respect it.

My two cents.
I have not done any of the lifting part since I got the short ladder. I strained my back 'lifting' an 11 year old 'boy' out of my deuce - he weighed more than I did - imagine a 175 pound sack of potatoes being dropped into your arms. Nevermore, I have a ladder, if they cannot climb up and back down, they don't get in at all.
 

M813rc

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
3,728
1,372
113
Location
Near Austin, Texas
I am a big believer in letting the kids get in the trucks, except for the V100 for the reasons stated above.
When we do a touch-a-truck, I usually bring a 5-ton and the Mule, so big and small. So long as they behave, they get to sit in the drivers seat, wiggle the steering wheel, etc. For the tall enough ones, I get them to close the door and lean an elbow on the window sill for the parents to take "like they own it" pictures. I often bring the M146 shop trailer behind the M931 because even though there usually isn't much in there, they love to climb up in it.

I carry handi-wipes and a bottle of rubbing alcohol, so when the sticky fingered nosepickers leave at the end of the day I can swab all the boogers off my steering wheel to drive home.

One of the main reasons I do all this is because when I was quite wee (maybe 6 years old) in the mid-1960s, my dad took me down to the docks in Dublin (I grew up in Ireland) to see new army trucks being delivered, mostly Unimogs and Bedford RLs. The soldiers let me climb up in all the trucks, vroom vroom and wiggle the steering wheel, and told me what the buttons did, etc. This instilled in me a life-long love of MVs and some memories I never forgot.
If I can return that favour to some newer kids, I do. Maybe one day some of those kids will grow up and be future caretakers of some of our vehicles, because they are the future of our hobby.

Cheers

PS - since these pictures were taken, I added handrails to my trailer ladders to make getting in and out safer.

1.jpg 4.jpg
 

Buck Wampum

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
50
85
18
Location
SE PA
I flat out don't let people in the V100. I have scars on my head from banging into fixtures in there while working on it, so it is not "safe", and besides that I don't want them coonfingering my stuff inside (like radios and other gear).
I lock the right side and rear hatches from inside, and only allow supervised looking in the left side hatch. If I have to take a break and step away from the vehicle, and don't have someone to relieve me, I close and latch the lower half of the side door, and have a piece of plexiglass with metal tabs that slips under the hinge side of the door, and a slot that fits over the padlock tab on the other side. I can padlock that in place, it covers the whole opening, folks can still look in but can't reach inside. If I am going to be out of sight of the V, I go ahead and close and padlock the side hatch.

With the big trucks I only allow one kid at a time to get in the driver's seat, and only if their parents are there to approve and supervise them getting in and out. And I'm not bashful about telling them to get out if they start acting like a monkey on a rock. With the M931, I drain the air tanks, which locks the brakes, and unhook the battery dogbone so it can't be "accidentally" started. With the tanks drained, they can't blow the air horn either!

Having vicarious knowledge of Ferret Finger, if I were displaying one, I'd have to close those hatches. The bite can be rather severe. Just not worth the risk.

Cheers
I laughed (in sympathy) when I read of your scars from banging into various parts f the V-100 interior. My nemesis is the rear dome light, especially it's control switch. I inadvertently lifted my head after installing the transfer case cover and crowned myself on that switch so hard I thought I'd faint. Thankfully I was wearing my (mandatory) ski hat and that saved me from laying my scalp open. My other boogeyman is the stud/nut that holds on the winch control handle, up by the front dome light. That thing got me numerous times while I was installing a new fuel pump and master cylinders. I ended up putting a rubber cap over the stud to save my noggin. With one exception, I've had parents readily agree that the interior is a minefield of sharp edges.

After a summer season of about 15 car shows, I only had one person (a teenager) get in my V-100 without permission. He left rapidly after I caught him. I leave the right side door open (both halves) so little kids can see in, otherwise the parents pick them up to see over the closed lower door and their dirty shoes are promptly rubbing on the lower door half if it's closed. I leave the other doors half closed. I've been very lucky to have been parked next to great people at car shows, who will keep an eye on the vehicle if I have to leave for a break. I had business cards made with my cell phone number on them and ask them to call my cell if anything untoward happens in my absence. So far so good.

I think I will get a gate chain to go over the door opening if I leave both halves open. Should prevent trespass.

I take Kendelrio's point about encouraging kids to love MV's, only wish the V-100 was a bit more accessible for them and that wear items (seat covers, hatch pads, etc.,) were more available should a mishap occur. Alas, it's a rare bird that is seldom seen outside of a museum.
 

M813rc

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
3,728
1,372
113
Location
Near Austin, Texas
I laughed (in sympathy) when I read of your scars from banging into various parts of the V-100 interior. My nemesis is the rear dome light, especially it's control switch. I inadvertently lifted my head after installing the transfer case cover and crowned myself on that switch so hard I thought I'd faint. Thankfully I was wearing my (mandatory) ski hat and that saved me from laying my scalp open.
I have cussed the studs that hold that light, and then the light itself after it was installed, many times! And a few other pointy bits.
My better half came out and asked me one day "Why are you wearing a wooly hat in there, it's 104*?!?!" I just pointed at that light.

People at car shows or touch-a truck events are better mannered about MVs than people at airshows, mainly because around here the active military let people crawl willy nilly all over their stuff, including helicopters ( :oops: ) so they see our military stuff and think they have free range there too. I have found that leaving a hatch on the V100 half closed will not prevent folks from just lifting their kid over it and putting them inside. Or opening it up.
I came up with the plexiglass after having some kid with a mega sized coke lean in the hatch with it and accidentally drop said coke into the V. It got all over everything.

Being a pilot myself, I asked the helo pilots about all the switches getting flipped, etc., they said "We carry spares with us for the ones that get broken, and do a very careful preflight before we go".
Well, okay then!

Cheers
 

Karl kostman

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
2,213
626
113
Location
Fargo ND
When I take my trucks to shows I always stand right there to answer any questions etc. and I lock the passenger side door so anybody that want to sit in the truck has to have my OK to do so. One thing I noticed at my first showing is that when the show is over you still have to be with your truck to monitor it, this time I was talking to some other truck owners and turned around to see a guy with two kids in the cab of my truck and I walked over to ask them what they were doing since the show was over and all these vehicles are personally owned? The dads reply was this is a show and we can do anything we want to. I somewhat politely corrected him and reminded him that permission is a common courtesy to get before crawling around someone elses POV!
This summer I will be going to a show and will have a couple trucks there and this is a 4 day show so security was a big point I asked about during our meeting with the show officials and they are going to have police onsite every night the trucks are sitting out unattended, I will still take the crossover straps off my batteries when I leave!
 

Mullaney

Well-known member
Supporting Vendor
6,146
15,030
113
Location
Charlotte NC
When I take my trucks to shows I always stand right there to answer any questions etc. and I lock the passenger side door so anybody that want to sit in the truck has to have my OK to do so. One thing I noticed at my first showing is that when the show is over you still have to be with your truck to monitor it, this time I was talking to some other truck owners and turned around to see a guy with two kids in the cab of my truck and I walked over to ask them what they were doing since the show was over and all these vehicles are personally owned? The dads reply was this is a show and we can do anything we want to. I somewhat politely corrected him and reminded him that permission is a common courtesy to get before crawling around someone elses POV!
This summer I will be going to a show and will have a couple trucks there and this is a 4 day show so security was a big point I asked about during our meeting with the show officials and they are going to have police onsite every night the trucks are sitting out unattended, I will still take the crossover straps off my batteries when I leave!
.
I could rant for hours...
Sad part is somebody participating should know better.

I would still lock it down and not count on police security.
No reflection on the PD, but watching trucks could easily be abandoned for something more urgent.
 
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website like our supporting vendors. Their ads help keep Steel Soldiers going. Please consider disabling your ad blockers for the site. Thanks!

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks