Inquiry on "rating"

Tudorp

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I am new to these M880 series Dodges. I absolutely love the one I recently found and bought (rust free 1976 M882). I do know that these are basically civilian W200 Power Wagons. I also understand that they have the exact Dana 44 front, Dana 60 rear that the civilian W200 use. However, the question I have is this. The W200 is rated as a 3/4 ton truck. The Military rates the M880 series truck as a 1-1/4 ton. Why does the Military rate it much higher than Dodge does? I am under the impression that the springs are the same that are used on the W200. What exactly is it that makes the M880 series a 1-1/4 ton rating?
 

msgjd

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well I can give you my 2 cents as owning a M880 and M890 for many years and also seeing them haul (some ungodly bulky loads and trailer loads) in the military when they were new .. It is my understanding that although the rear axles share the same model number, the M's supposedly have a heavier rear axle than the civilian trucks, thus a higher load capacity rating.. Consider that some Jeep CJ's had dana 44's and 60's, and you know how light those axles are in comparison to a 3/4T truck with same model numbers ... Dana model number does not determine weight rating.. As for the springs you see, the M880/890-series rear springs are usually not any different than the 3/4T civilian trucks, thus you get an equivalent 3/4T ride empty. BUT if you get underneath your truck and look , you should see a pair of what we called "load blocks" or "limiter blocks" between the frame and spring set .. As the load increases, the frame eventually hits the blocks and thus your springs are no longer carrying the load. This allowed more weight to be piled on without bending the springs downward any more.... The only negative experience anyone I know had ever had with these blocks is when a load puts the frame down onto the blocks just a little bit. Then, when every bump or hump or railroad track causes the truck to lift up, it then comes back down on the blocks with a big "thud!" that you swear is gonna break the truck in two .. If the truck is on a rough and bouncy road, it is like getting hammered "bang! thud! .. thud... thud thud thud,... wham!" The key is to either run it empty or on up to a 3/4T load to keep it off the blocks, or load it to the max to keep it down on the blocks .. But at 5/4T, the truck will definitely sag in the rear, be light in the front, and will want to sway on corners .. I rarely put more than 3/4T in either of mine, but they both have handled 5/4T loads when tasked. It's the rear tires that I worry about with loads like that but I supposed I had gotten spoiled by the security and stability of dually pickup trucks .. (y)(y)

I don't have time at the moment to confirm the axle difference with reference to a parts manual or online, but that is where you can look for yourself ..Welcome to the 1970's power-wagon world !
 
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Tudorp

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Location
Texas
It is my understanding that although the rear axles share the same model number, the M's supposedly have a heavier rear axle than the civilian trucks, thus a higher load capacity rating.. . , you should see a pair of what we called "load blocks" or "limiter blocks" between the frame and spring set ..
makes sense as far as the axle shaft difference. Also the addition of the (what I always called) overload springs. Thanks for the reply.
 

msgjd

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makes sense as far as the axle shaft difference. Also the addition of the (what I always called) overload springs. Thanks for the reply.
as you may have noticed, the M880-series doesn't have overload springs, but other dodges of that era sometimes do
 

Bob H

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Having owned multiple M880 series trucks & their civilian W200 cousins since 2004. I have learned quite a bit about these trucks.
The M880 is a Dodge W200 all axles, springs, shocks etc. are standard Dodge W200 parts.
The W200 has a 8000lb GVW, the curb weight of the empty truck is listed at 4790 leaving 3210 lbs
The W200 has a 2500lb cargo rating 1-1/4 tons is equal to 2500lbs.
The difference between the D60 rear & the D60 HD rear is the differential casting on the HD has some ribs.
Some M880/M890 series trucks randomly received an HD housing, and the replacement part chain also had some HD housings.
Note an Ford F250 is a 3/4 ton truck, the 250 represents a 2500lb cargo capacity, like the 2500 on other 3/4 ton trucks.
 

msgjd

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The difference between the D60 rear & the D60 HD rear is the differential casting on the HD has some ribs.
Some M880/M890 series trucks randomly received an HD housing, and the replacement part chain also had some HD housings.
Both my M880 and M890 have the ribbed HD rear axle housing , Neither of the W200's I owned had a ribbed rear axle, but they had helper springs.. You posted a bunch of good data, I no longer have any W200 manuals thus don't recall their load rating
 
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