Plan to buy a 3D printer

Havok

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Plain old Elmer's white school glue thinned out and applied in two coats (opposite directions of brushing) with a large flat brush has worked the best for me out of all the different adhesives I have tried, including Magigoo and other fancy ones. I also tried every white craft glue, none did very well. Elmer's stick is good for some simpler filaments like PLA, but for Nylon one needs very good hold, and Elmer's worked much better than any other for me. That is on both carbon lattice sheet and glass bed.
BDGR
I 100% agree I use glue every time but the Elmers purple glue haha. Not sure if it makes a difference. Great idea on two applications. I use a glass bed.
 
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HDN

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I only have adhesion issues with Nylons but my suggestion would be to heat the bed up an extra 5*C and see if that helps.
I'm already running the bed at 100 deg C for ABS, so I don't have much, if any room left unless I can beef up the printer's power supply. I don't plan to do that any time soon. I'd rather have a print bed that heats evenly like it should. But Chinese quality will be Chinese quality :rolleyes:
 

Bulldogger

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I'm already running the bed at 100 deg C for ABS, so I don't have much, if any room left unless I can beef up the printer's power supply. I don't plan to do that any time soon. I'd rather have a print bed that heats evenly like it should. But Chinese quality will be Chinese quality :rolleyes:
I have to run at 110C bed temp for common or exotic Nylon to have a chance. If you have a heated chamber that will also help with part flexion and reduce it trying to warp and pull off the bed (a little).

That said: Taulman Bridge nylon prints relatively well at modest temperatures (sub 100C bed and normal hot end 240C), and it is competitively priced. I have had good results with Taulman products in the past and have several Kg on hand.

My challenge in advanced nylon printing and related bed adhesion issues was self-imposed; I chose to print the cheapest 0.080" nylon weed wacker string I could get. It was VERY cheap, and it took MANY tries, but I suceeded in getting relatively large complex parts (relatively = 1.5" x 5" x 9") and I managed to sort the kinks out before I went even halfway through the first 5# spool (which cost about $25 at the time IIRC).

BDGR
 

HDN

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Finger Lakes Region, NY
So, I know absolutely nothing about 3d printing. I'd like to make stuff. I have downloaded some print files of some stuff I'd like to make.

What do I need besides filament, and what's pictured below?
That's basically what I started with. If you want to learn some CAD stuff so you can print your own creations, let me know - I'm thinking about offering tutoring for Autodesk Fusion 360, which has a free license for hobbyists. I'd probably do it over Skype or something.

What do you plan on printing? If it's models, PLA filament will work fine unless they're fish tank ornaments - PLA is biodegradable! If parts for stuff, ABS is a good material, but requires an enclosure that may need temperature control for best results.

Where do you plan on running the printer? Make sure you have enough fresh air circulating through the space or an air purifier since 3D printing puts some stuff in the air you may not want to breathe. My printer is enclosed in my shop with a small exhaust fan ducted outside.
 
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