A real trooper

Steel Soldiers is supported by:

montaillou

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
442
38
28
Location
W.WA
So, aside from problems with the injector, my deuce has really done well by me. I've put a few thousand miles on it and driven it over the Cascade Mts. 5 times now.

I'm making a few changes with the idea of going on some serious, potentially months (years?) long trips. Is there something(s) I should I should consider replacing that maybe I've just been lucky about up to now?
 

Jeepsinker

Well-known member
5,188
28
48
Location
Dry Creek, Louisiana
Yes. Not being a d**k, but the engine. You are playing with fire venturing far from home with a multifuel under the hood, and when it slings a rod the tow bill will cost more than the purchase price of the truck.

I've been all over the country in mine and got lucky. Mine pulled a liner and locked up in front of my shop. So now I'm installing a Cummins and I have confidence that it isn't going to self ventilate 1500 miles from home.
 

montaillou

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
442
38
28
Location
W.WA
Using that logic, I should either replace everything or buy a new truck.
 

cattlerepairman

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
2,303
314
83
Location
NORTH (Canada)
I get what Jeepsinker is saying. The multifuel in its variants is a six decades old design that is nowhere near as reliable as a modern diesel. The multi is not a bad engine by any stretch - but it is what it is. Even rebuilt it will leak. I had the NOS heads checked for plane, the deck as well. New head gasket. Retorqued. 1000 miles...it weeps oil. It will likely run for a long time. Some even continue running with a hole in the block. The IP and HH will likely hold out. Or not. I have just driven it for 8 days straight with heavy loads, all day long, 12 hours a day. No hiccups other than a sudden momentary power loss after cresting a steep hill (as if you inadvertently pulled the shutoff). Nothing? Impending doom from the HH?

I have seen all the innards. It is as well built as any other engine of that vintage. It is not a "lightbulb engine" as some called it (use and throw away). Upgraded rod bolts and upgraded head gaskets have helped it a lot. If you have a "TD" cast block you can use up-rated ARB head studs and clamp that gasket even tighter. Is yours a "TD"?

That said, I will never fully trust it. I share Jeepsinkers trepidation about taking that engine and that IP/HH far from home. I have had similar road-trip thoughts but that engine is a limiting factor for me. How lucky do you feel and how good are you at roadside McGyver fixes?

I look at people that have worked on diesels all their life, such as rustystud. He didn't do a Commins swap and he plans to go up the West Coast to Alaska in his truck. He likely wouldn't do that if he didn't think he can keep the mill running.

The rest of the drive train is simple; check good clutch, good U-joints, good transmission and transfer case bearings and seals, pinion bearings and seals, breaks and wheel bearings - you likely have a reliable drive train for thousands and thousands of miles.
 
Last edited:

Jeepsinker

Well-known member
5,188
28
48
Location
Dry Creek, Louisiana
Yeah you don't need to replace the whole truck because the engine isn't trustworthy. I'm not sure how you extrapolated that from what I said.
Pretty much any common failure these truck suffer can be fixed with minimal tools in a parking lot. The only one that can't is a catastrophic engine failure. So my logic is to simply install a better engine and keep the rest. Engine retrofits in older vehicles of all types are quite common because of this, increased efficiency, and increased power availability.

I've done what you are doing for years and it lead me here. You asked for advice on what you should change from experienced members, and I'm giving you my well informed opinion. If it isn't what you want to do that's fine, I understand. It isn't a cheap or expedient undertaking. I'm not going to be mad at you either way. Just trying to be helpful.

I used to carry spare water pump, alternator, starter, turbo, and injector pump as well as a head gasket set with me on road trips. I still carry two wheel cylinders, a master cylinder, wheel bearing set, four pounds of grease, some brake fluid, hub seals, extra start switch, master switch...
 

porkysplace

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
9,143
269
83
Location
mid- michigan
Yeah you don't need to replace the whole truck because the engine isn't trustworthy. I'm not sure how you extrapolated that from what I said.
Pretty much any common failure these truck suffer can be fixed with minimal tools in a parking lot. The only one that can't is a catastrophic engine failure. So my logic is to simply install a better engine and keep the rest. Engine retrofits in older vehicles of all types are quite common because of this, increased efficiency, and increased power availability.

I've done what you are doing for years and it lead me here. You asked for advice on what you should change from experienced members, and I'm giving you my well informed opinion. If it isn't what you want to do that's fine, I understand. It isn't a cheap or expedient undertaking. I'm not going to be mad at you either way. Just trying to be helpful.

I used to carry spare water pump, alternator, starter, turbo, and injector pump as well as a head gasket set with me on road trips. I still carry two wheel cylinders, a master cylinder, wheel bearing set, four pounds of grease, some brake fluid, hub seals, extra start switch, master switch...
I wouldn't say Cummins is that much better of engine , it's just you can get parts anywhere and is a cheap motor to rebuild. And now you can get china knock-offs.
 

Jeepsinker

Well-known member
5,188
28
48
Location
Dry Creek, Louisiana
I'd be interested to hear your perspective on how the 12 valve 6BT isn't a better engine in every aspect, but I don't want to derail the gentleman's thread. The only thing I could think of is that it is a parent bore engine instead of having liners, but they are still well known for lasting over 500k- 750k miles even with heavy use and still being buildable, sometimes with nothing more than cylinder honing.

The multifuel is lucky to reach 40k without kicking a rod out the side.
 

porkysplace

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
9,143
269
83
Location
mid- michigan
I'd be interested to hear your perspective on how the 12 valve 6BT isn't a better engine in every aspect, but I don't want to derail the gentleman's thread. The only thing I could think of is that it is a parent bore engine instead of having liners, but they are still well known for lasting over 500k- 750k miles even with heavy use and still being buildable, sometimes with nothing more than cylinder honing.

The multifuel is lucky to reach 40k without kicking a rod out the side.
The 4 and 6 b series are known to ventilate.
 

Attachments

Jeepsinker

Well-known member
5,188
28
48
Location
Dry Creek, Louisiana
Never seen that as a common issue with the mechanical B series engines. Very common with common rail Cummins, which is what you posted there, but that's a whole different engine. Sintered rods, not forged.
 

montaillou

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
442
38
28
Location
W.WA
Well, aside from age many of these trucks really don't have all that many miles. Also, while in the military they would've been well cared for...except for those stuck in a back lot to rust before and auction.

Any engine/vehicle can suffer catastrophic issues even in the first 1000 miles. While I am putting some trust in the truck I'm putting more in my ability to handle what comes and to roll with what I can't control. The last bit of your post about what you carried with you on trips, how often did you use what you brought? And was everything working fine before you left?
 

LiveFreeOrDieTryn2B

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
773
1
18
Location
Springfield AR
Here's my advice I have a rebuilt LDS Multifuel engine has about 5kor 6k on it. Keep RPMs in the 2000 to 2300 range. I run a water injection pump nylon fan and use Lucas products in all the trucks oils. I also use Seafoam. It all comes down to PMs and how hard you drive it. In the end Murphy's law is always in play no matter what you drive.I also use Lucas green grease exclusively.
 
Last edited:

Jeepsinker

Well-known member
5,188
28
48
Location
Dry Creek, Louisiana
Well, aside from age many of these trucks really don't have all that many miles. Also, while in the military they would've been well cared for...except for those stuck in a back lot to rust before and auction.

Any engine/vehicle can suffer catastrophic issues even in the first 1000 miles. While I am putting some trust in the truck I'm putting more in my ability to handle what comes and to roll with what I can't control. The last bit of your post about what you carried with you on trips, how often did you use what you brought? And was everything working fine before you left?
Yes my truck has always been well maintained and everything has always worked properly before I've started on trips.

I've never had a failure of any kind on the road in my deuce other than a couple flats. I carry the parts as insurance. Basically, if you have the parts with you, you are guaranteed that you won't need what you have. So far it has worked.:)
 
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website like our supporting vendors. Their ads help keep Steel Soldiers going. Please consider disabling your ad blockers for the site. Thanks!

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks