bunch of brake line questions

grymsr

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Hi. I am in the process of working on my brakes and replacing the wheel cylinders, and have run into some issues with leaking brake fittings. I had a leak from the right rear fitting which had been buggered up by a previous owner. I removed the steel line to check the flares and discovered that at the block end it is a double flare but at the cylinder end it is a single flare. My first question is shouldn't both ends be flared the same way? I read that the AN flare is a single flare but I'm not sure these are AN lines. Can anybody shed more light on this?
 

grymsr

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Location
Maine
Hi. I am in the process of working on my brakes and replacing the wheel cylinders, and have run into some issues with leaking brake fittings. I had a leak from the right rear fitting which had been buggered up by a previous owner. I removed the steel line to check the flares and discovered that at the block end it is a double flare but at the cylinder end it is a single flare. My first question is shouldn't both ends be flared the same way? I read that the AN flare is a single flare but I'm not sure these are AN lines. Can anybody shed more light on this?
block end flare.JPGcylinder side flare.JPG sorry, had to add pictures later.
 

NDT

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so, should I cut and reflare or just replace entire line?
If you have the flare kit and the line is not damaged, sure reuse it. Otherwise these lines are available premade at most auto parts stores in various lengths.
 

grymsr

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NOS means new old stock, as in a 40 year old new part that was never installed. If you removed this part, it is not nos. It is not original equipment either, it is a poorly made repair part installed by someone in the last 50 years.
The line was far too clean to be original. a bunch of repairs and mods were made by previous owner and the lines and hoses all look very new and match the military materials and coatings. That's why I think the are NOS.
 

Mullaney

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The line was far too clean to be original. a bunch of repairs and mods were made by previous owner and the lines and hoses all look very new and match the military materials and coatings. That's why I think the are NOS.
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It would be really difficult (maybe impossible) to know if the "very new" brake line "look" means NOS or not.

I wouldn't hesitate to replace any steel line on your truck if it is bent, kinked or rusty looking. Regular steel brake line. It comes in different sizes too, so try to match to what you remove. The Double Flaring Tool isn't terribly expensive. As mentioned above, a single flare shouldn't be used on hydraulic brakes.

While you are looking at the brake lines, it might be worth bending and twisting and pulling on the rubber lines that attach to the truck frame. Look for cracks and generally look at them as if your life depends on it. A word of caution: Don't try to "cheap out" on those rubber hoses. There are cheap ones out there at "Joe's" supply house. Also need to consider that there are 40 or 50 year old NOS hoses that might be no better than what you have today. Talking to some of the Vendors on SS should be able to help you find quality parts if yours need to be replaced. Call some of the advertisers. They can point you in the right direction if you need those parts.

Happy Repairing!!
 

frank8003

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Brake lines must be double flare
and see post 20 in here

" NAPA- in his book these are NOT listed as brake lines,, listed as heavy duty wire clad steel tubing"
 

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Mullaney

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I am going to try to reuse the brake line I removed by cutting off the bad fitting and installing a union. I also plan to make a new stainless line just to learn how.
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Chances are that will work. I have definitely done exactly what you are describing.

I am fairly sure that they are steel. I don't believe they are stainless. Couldn't swear to it not being available, but the ones I have seen definitely rust.

Making a new line... The straight pieces of line aren't very expensive. Get yourself two or three pieces and lay the old one on a table and start at one end GENTLY bending or forming the new to match the old. IF you put even a single kink in the steel line - it is over. You absolutely cannot use a kinked line, no exceptions. If a kink happens, use that line to practice bending. That is all it is good for now, but you may as well make it a learning experience.

If you need to make a bend really close to the fitting, I can share some magic with you. Let me know if you need that. AND, if it seems that bending gently by hand isn't working for you - it may be that you need a tubing bender...

Best of luck with your project. It is definitely "doable". It just may take you a little time to work out how to make it work...
 

frank8003

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Chances are that will work. I have definitely done exactly what you are describing.

I am fairly sure that they are steel. I don't believe they are stainless. Couldn't swear to it not being available, but the ones I have seen definitely rust.

Making a new line... The straight pieces of line aren't very expensive. Get yourself two or three pieces and lay the old one on a table and start at one end GENTLY bending or forming the new to match the old. IF you put even a single kink in the steel line - it is over. You absolutely cannot use a kinked line, no exceptions. If a kink happens, use that line to practice bending. That is all it is good for now, but you may as well make it a learning experience.

If you need to make a bend really close to the fitting, I can share some magic with you. Let me know if you need that. AND, if it seems that bending gently by hand isn't working for you - it may be that you need a tubing bender...

Best of luck with your project. It is definitely "doable". It just may take you a little time to work out how to make it work...
Do Not put unions in the brake lines unless they are double flare like originals

 

Mullaney

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I am going to try to reuse the brake line I removed by cutting off the bad fitting and installing a union. I also plan to make a new stainless line just to learn how.
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By the way grymsr,

Please know that we aren't a bunch of jerks here.

Both Frank and I are trying to be certain that you don't hurt yourself or somebody else.
These trucks are big and heavy. They could easily flatten most passenger cars.
A broken brake line is evil at best.

SAFETY is the reason for us being pushy...
 

grymsr

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Maine
.
By the way grymsr,

Please know that we aren't a bunch of jerks here.

Both Frank and I are trying to be certain that you don't hurt yourself or somebody else.
These trucks are big and heavy. They could easily flatten most passenger cars.
A broken brake line is evil at best.

SAFETY is the reason for us being pushy...
No offense taken. Safety is premier with me too. I have been researching brakelines, flares, and much more. I only wondered how the single flare got into my truck in the first place. the double flare end looks pretty good but the single flare end looks a bit sketchy. I spent a bunch with JEGS on brake tools and more on CNF lines and fittings. I am now waiting for it all to arrive.
At the rear, end with the single flare is very close to the bend. Perhaps that is why it wasn't flared correctly.100_1827.JPG100_1828.JPG
 

grymsr

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here is the bend near the right rear brake. really tight access thus the short fitting
100_1830.JPG
also probably why the fitting got so boogered up
 

grymsr

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Location
Maine
.
Chances are that will work. I have definitely done exactly what you are describing.

I am fairly sure that they are steel. I don't believe they are stainless. Couldn't swear to it not being available, but the ones I have seen definitely rust.

Making a new line... The straight pieces of line aren't very expensive. Get yourself two or three pieces and lay the old one on a table and start at one end GENTLY bending or forming the new to match the old. IF you put even a single kink in the steel line - it is over. You absolutely cannot use a kinked line, no exceptions. If a kink happens, use that line to practice bending. That is all it is good for now, but you may as well make it a learning experience.

If you need to make a bend really close to the fitting, I can share some magic with you. Let me know if you need that. AND, if it seems that bending gently by hand isn't working for you - it may be that you need a tubing bender...

Best of luck with your project. It is definitely "doable". It just may take you a little time to work out how to make it work...
I could probably use your magic as the bends running to the wheel cylinder are rather snug. I bought a tubing bender and flaring tool and am only waiting for the line to arrive. it is CNF line which I have learned bends very easily. still, I plan to go slowly and meticulously the whole time. when the line arrives, then I'll get started.
 
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