CNC Mill

NY Tom

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Fusion 360 is surprisingly good and cost effective compared to other programs. Started using it at work when we got a true CNC mill and had no CAM software. Realized it was included with our AutoCAD package. Worth it compared to MasterCAM have not found anything I could not do with it yet.
 

Neophyte

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Fusion 360 is surprisingly good and cost effective compared to other programs. Started using it at work when we got a true CNC mill and had no CAM software. Realized it was included with our AutoCAD package. Worth it compared to MasterCAM have not found anything I could not do with it yet.
Very true! If you can draw in autocad, know your set up, it’s amazing what it automates.
 

Neophyte

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I need to learn fusion a lot more. And especially the CAM side of it for my anillam controller.
Fusion likely has an Anillam post processor when you go to create the code. I found a ton of information on the Fusion forums as to post processing. After creating my tool file (I own Maritool holders, made in USA, Fusion has pre set tool files for most of what they offer)......then using selected 2D and 3D paths for what ever project I’m on in the “manufacturing” CAM side.....rarely has the post processed code come out with errors. The simulation really helps prior to post processing....gives you anticipated errors, missed machining due to tool constraints, then run time.

If you can give me your exact machine, year of manufacture.....I’ll check the CAM side of fusion and see if it’s supported.

Bob
 

NY Tom

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It is great. I love how you can copy and paste an entire setup from one job to another. If you have similar jobs or parts to make it really speeds things up.

Tool library great as well put the P/N and vendor right in there easy to order more.

Running 2010 & 2018 FANUC ROBODrill here; post processor for that is perfect made very few changes to it never one error. Pretty common control so I am sure that helps.

Anyone ever use the MILLPWR NC control on a Bridgeport? The place I work has three of them. Had seen ProtoTRAK before but these MILLPWR are so easy to use and program total game changer. Made all of our tooling on them for years. Even toolmakers can program almost anything if you give them a hole chart X & Y

This is all old stuff by now but still amazes me...
 

Mos68x

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Wow, I got on the website to look for information regarding GP small tents and found something else I needed. Since I’ve seen this, I’ve got a couple questions since any shops that are “local” to me are either not reliable, or won’t consider work that isn’t under a large contract.

1) Is anyone willing to do work for me? I need some parts for either the tooling I need to finish my M939 RV project or for the project itself or the truck.

2) I currently use Fusion360 for design and analysis. Although I have had some experience in my junior years working as a machinists apprentice, I would not call myself knowledgeable. What file formats would y’all need to “proof” any designs just to be sure of “machine-ability”?

3) Does anyone have the ability to plasma, laser, or water jet cut 1” A36 steel? I’m still trying to find someone to cut parts for me so I can finish the hydraulic legs so I can lift the 20’ shipping container. I still need to finish the chassis for it to be bolted to the M939 and then finally mounted.

Thanks!
 

Mullaney

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Wow, I got on the website to look for information regarding GP small tents and found something else I needed. Since I’ve seen this, I’ve got a couple questions since any shops that are “local” to me are either not reliable, or won’t consider work that isn’t under a large contract.

1) Is anyone willing to do work for me? I need some parts for either the tooling I need to finish my M939 RV project or for the project itself or the truck.

2) I currently use Fusion360 for design and analysis. Although I have had some experience in my junior years working as a machinists apprentice, I would not call myself knowledgeable. What file formats would y’all need to “proof” any designs just to be sure of “machine-ability”?

3) Does anyone have the ability to plasma, laser, or water jet cut 1” A36 steel? I’m still trying to find someone to cut parts for me so I can finish the hydraulic legs so I can lift the 20’ shipping container. I still need to finish the chassis for it to be bolted to the M939 and then finally mounted.

Thanks!
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I wonder - if I was going to spend an entire sack of money - to build myself a nice overlander truck... Would I spend a small stack of money to build a 1/8th scale version of my dream truck? Should it be done with plastic in a 3-D Printer?

OR, would I spend way too much time and money to build a 3-D model of a truck that I could just buy a real truck from GP? Then I could spend a small sack of money to fix up the truck and then use it for building my habitat.

OR would it be smart to build a model of just the habitat and do all that work to learn how everything would fit inside. The water tanks and water heaters that lay between the frame rails would just have to be considered later. Maybe a medium sack of money to do that work?

Just fishing for ideas.
 

Neophyte

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
Wow, I got on the website to look for information regarding GP small tents and found something else I needed. Since I’ve seen this, I’ve got a couple questions since any shops that are “local” to me are either not reliable, or won’t consider work that isn’t under a large contract.

1) Is anyone willing to do work for me? I need some parts for either the tooling I need to finish my M939 RV project or for the project itself or the truck.

2) I currently use Fusion360 for design and analysis. Although I have had some experience in my junior years working as a machinists apprentice, I would not call myself knowledgeable. What file formats would y’all need to “proof” any designs just to be sure of “machine-ability”?

3) Does anyone have the ability to plasma, laser, or water jet cut 1” A36 steel? I’m still trying to find someone to cut parts for me so I can finish the hydraulic legs so I can lift the 20’ shipping container. I still need to finish the chassis for it to be bolted to the M939 and then finally mounted.

Thanks!
Typically a .dxf will do…..but I think if you took an iPic of your Fusion 360 drawing (with dimensions) and posted in here, you’d get a bunch of ideas on how to produce what you‘re looking for. Unless you’re looking for ”close” tolerance parts (small quantity), CNC with set up time, fixtures, tooling would cost a bundle (figure machine and labor at $80/ hour + tooling+ fixtures). If you can go +/- 0.005 to 0.010 , a torch and Bridgeport might be a viable cost effective solution (likely a retired machinist with mill in his garage near you). My $0.02.
 

HDN

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.
I wonder - if I was going to spend an entire sack of money - to build myself a nice overlander truck... Would I spend a small stack of money to build a 1/8th scale version of my dream truck? Should it be done with plastic in a 3-D Printer?

OR, would I spend way too much time and money to build a 3-D model of a truck that I could just buy a real truck from GP? Then I could spend a small sack of money to fix up the truck and then use it for building my habitat.

OR would it be smart to build a model of just the habitat and do all that work to learn how everything would fit inside. The water tanks and water heaters that lay between the frame rails would just have to be considered later. Maybe a medium sack of money to do that work?

Just fishing for ideas.
I wouldn't bother with 3D printing models for something like that, but that's just me. I'd start with a drawing of how you want to lay your truck out. My wife and I were considering buying a school bus to convert to an RV and we started out with a piece of paper with a floor plan on it. If you're more visual and have cardboard and children's doll house furniture laying around you could use that to make a mini mock-up.
 

Mos68x

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Typically a .dxf will do…..but I think if you took an iPic of your Fusion 360 drawing (with dimensions) and posted in here, you’d get a bunch of ideas on how to produce what you‘re looking for. Unless you’re looking for ”close” tolerance parts (small quantity), CNC with set up time, fixtures, tooling would cost a bundle (figure machine and labor at $80/ hour + tooling+ fixtures). If you can go +/- 0.005 to 0.010 , a torch and Bridgeport might be a viable cost effective solution (likely a retired machinist with mill in his garage near you). My $0.02.
Sadly, with as far out in the boonies as I live, there is no one near me that would have a Bridgeport. If I did they’d make a killin off me 😂 I’m just about to spend $600 on the cheap HF mini lathe just so I can get the hydraulic legs going again for the RV project.
 

Neophyte

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Steel Soldiers Supporter
Sadly, with as far out in the boonies as I live, there is no one near me that would have a Bridgeport. If I did they’d make a killin off me 😂 I’m just about to spend $600 on the cheap HF mini lathe just so I can get the hydraulic legs going again for the RV project.
That‘s probably your best option…..I couldn’t imagine what it would cost if we didn’t fix/repair/do our own maintenance. I would love to pull into Jiffy Lube and see what they’d charge for an oil/filter change on a NHC250.
 

frank8003

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That‘s probably your best option…..I couldn’t imagine what it would cost if we didn’t fix/repair/do our own maintenance. I would love to pull into Jiffy Lube and see what they’d charge for an oil/filter change on a NHC250.
I would not even take my Chevy to Jiffy lube.................................
 

Mos68x

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I did take the 939 to a speedco once to get the oil changed, But all they could do was change the oil, which still cost $100. Just plain std oil, nothing synth about it. If I had the power requirements for a Bridgeport I would certainly buy one, but I’m of grid running of solar, and to set up 3 phase for that is just plain stupid amounts of $$$.
 

Mullaney

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I did take the 939 to a speedco once to get the oil changed, But all they could do was change the oil, which still cost $100. Just plain std oil, nothing synth about it. If I had the power requirements for a Bridgeport I would certainly buy one, but I’m of grid running of solar, and to set up 3 phase for that is just plain stupid amounts of $$$.
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Might not be as awful as you think. You mentioned that you already have experience with solar. You know what it cost to do what you did. Just need to multiply that by three to create your 3-Phase circuit... I have seen several discussions where folks have had a machine with industrial power in their garage at home - and most local power companies (generally) won't build the grid to support it. Replacing the great big fat electric motor with single phase 220/240v solves that. Again - generally speaking - spending a large sack of money for that conversion might cost more than three solar banks.

I too would love to have a Bridgeport. The times I do need one, I hire that work done :-(
Heck, I would need a building to put it in so I don't see that happening any time soon...
 

Neophyte

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I did take the 939 to a speedco once to get the oil changed, But all they could do was change the oil, which still cost $100. Just plain std oil, nothing synth about it. If I had the power requirements for a Bridgeport I would certainly buy one, but I’m of grid running of solar, and to set up 3 phase for that is just plain stupid amounts of $$$.
I ran into same problem, but specifically sought out a machine that could work on single phase (with slight modification). It derated it from 15HP to 10HP, but for most applications, that’s fine. A Bridgeport can be converted to single phase (change out motor or go with a rotary converter), but like anything in our hobbies…it costs $$. If off grid, you might be better off hiring a machine shop to do the work (vs buying equipment, tooling to do a one off task). I always kick myself when buying a “tool” I rarely use (in my case a MIG welder….I have a stick welder I use 98% of the time on projects, bought wrong MIG welder, good for sheet metal not much else).
 

NY Tom

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You only need 20A x 240VAC single phase and an inexpensive 1-1/2 or 2 HP Variable Frequency Drive to run a Bridgeport. You won't need to spend more than $200.00. maybe much less. As a benefit if you find an old J head with pulleys you can have variable speed by adding a potentiometer. Some have this built in check fleabay.

Here is a link to one that would work as an example.
 
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