FLU-419 fuel question - part above filter housing

The FLU farm

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Sorry, never got to it yesterday, but the one I bought (from somewhere, a few years ago) is a Bosch 0 341 001 001-001.

More important, perhaps, is that I don't remember how I came up with that P/N. It's not based on looks alone, that much I know.
 

The FLU farm

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I have extremely limited internet access these days, so can't say if we're talking about the same switch. But there's only one master switch as far as I know, so it should be.

And yes, they're not expensive at all.
 

The FLU farm

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Thanks, but I ordered a switch rated for over 300 Amps continuous to use with the winch, so as long as the factory switch handles keeping the gauges and starter operational , I should be good.
 

Elijah95

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Hi, I'm new here and this is my first post.

I bought a FLU419 a few weeks ago, and it has been quite an adventure in learning about these and fixing the issues I've found with it so far. I'm an aerospace guy so it's in my wheel house. I think I got lucky, it has the "Overhauled at RRAD" plates (2009), and only 53 hours on the engine since that. Seems like a really clean one.

This is not a troubleshooting thread, as I have already found and fixed the source of my fuel system problem. On mine, the main air leak was a missing crush washer on the banjo fitting at the fuel inlet to the lift pump. I also had to replace the hand pump primer thing, fuel filters, the gasket at the strainer, and all the fuel lines.

My question is, what is this unlabeled part above the fuel filter housing? I can't seem to find any information as to what it is or what it does. See attachment.
This truck in georgia?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

The FLU farm

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That's the perfect repair! One that fixes itself.

I started chasing potential ground issues yesterday, ran out of time, and today is lube day. Have two horse graves to dig and once down in the river rock (about four feet down) it gets a bit demanding on the machine. Would be a miserable task without the ripper.
 

Mullaney

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That's the perfect repair! One that fixes itself.

I started chasing potential ground issues yesterday, ran out of time, and today is lube day. Have two horse graves to dig and once down in the river rock (about four feet down) it gets a bit demanding on the machine. Would be a miserable task without the ripper.
.
That is no fun at all...
On the bright side, at least you have a machine to help what would otherwise be a really miserable thing.

-

Problem that fixes itself is great.
So long as it doesn't come back to bite you later.
Might just be that whatever sprayed it with solved it long term - or you squirt it monthly - just to be sure. :cool:
 

The FLU farm

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It's not quite as bad as it sounds. By digging "spare graves" now, while the weather is still nice and the ground not frozen isn't bad at all.

So far it has paid off and the spares haven't been needed (kinda like insurance), but we recently had to put two down in somewhat rapid succession. And there's at least four more that are over 20 years old, so...
 

Mullaney

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It's not quite as bad as it sounds. By digging "spare graves" now, while the weather is still nice and the ground not frozen isn't bad at all.

So far it has paid off and the spares haven't been needed (kinda like insurance), but we recently had to put two down in somewhat rapid succession. And there's at least four more that are over 20 years old, so...
.
Sad, but it is the cycle of life.

Funny how you can take care of critters that way - but whoa nellie - if you did that sort of thing for people "it would be uncivilized". Maybe that has more to do with money than being civilized. Think about all the money spent on planting people...
 

The FLU farm

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Yeah, these horses didn't keel over, but my girlfriend knew it'd be better to put them down than to let the suffer.
And they were not easy decisions for her, as she probably cares more about them than people. Well, most people.
 

Mullaney

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Yeah, these horses didn't keel over, but my girlfriend knew it'd be better to put them down than to let the suffer.
And they were not easy decisions for her, as she probably cares more about them than people. Well, most people.
.
Yessir, I have a very old dog that isn't far from his time. He still gets along well but slow.
Still acting like a normal dog with all his functions. No trouble now, but it won't be long I'm afraid.

Glad that she could do what needed to be done.
 

The Stuff Fixer

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Just for the heck of it, what figure and Item number is the Master Switch? Might be interesting to see what other alternatives there are.
If you don't have to have a military switch(function vs. form), EBAY has alot of different cutoff/master switches. I would use the style like on a Cat. loader/doizer from the 80's. I put a battery isolater switch on my travel trailer so I could cutoff the battery instead of having to disconnect it. Works great no more dead battery from a carbon monoxide detector that stays on.
 

talex419

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To update on how my FLU is doing now, may be of use to other people:

1. Mine had the bad transmission shift bushing, that seems to be really common. Replaced that, and my shifting issues went away. Had to make a special tool to compress the shifter spring cap to re-install, that was the hardest part.
2. My front bucket control levers were seized up, had to disassemble and de-rust the pivot between where the rods come out the back of the cab, and into the hydraulic valve. Seems like a grease point that often gets forgotten.
3. I blew the hydraulic seals in the boom cylinders after using the backhoe for a few hours. They looked pretty dried out and cracked. These should definitely be replaced before putting an FLU to actual work, if they haven't been done in a while.
 

talex419

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I still have a problem to debug with the rear switches. The idle up switch, front bucket control switch (from the backhoe seat), and the accessory hose switch all seem to not work. The rear work lights and tail lights function, however.
 
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