FLU419 SEE HMMH HME Owners group

Toolee

New member
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Location
Washington
Hi All--
I am a soon-to-be-new owner looking for wisdom and how-to related to using the rear hydraulics to run a skid steer mower attached via quick-tach to the SEE in place of the bucket . Do any of you have such an arrangement? What did you use for a valve to control flow from the cab? Where did you put the control valve? What is the route from rear to cab?
Thanks ahead of the time for the help!
 

The FLU farm

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
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The actual midwest, NM.
Hate to tell you, Toolee, but if you go back about two years in this thread you'll find photos of a quick-tach setup and partial hose routing.
I did it to run a snowblower, so no control valve involved, but check out Surplus Center (or a supplier of your choice) for options.
Oh, and welcome to the group.
 

Speedwoble

Well-known member
608
287
63
Location
New Holland, PA
FLU 419 Case 508 boom hydraulic cylinder is bleeding like crazy. Anyone have specifics on what what version of the Case 508 was used and how/where I might be able to pick up and rebuild kit? Everything works great, it is just leaking at the moment. :)
Looking through the Military parts manual and realized this info is hiding in plain sight. The CASE part numbers for the seal kits are all listed in the 2420-224-24P Example for the swing cylinder:
Seal kits.JPG

*Note* there are a couple of places where the Military manual lists a whole cylinder part number which is a newer version of the original CASE number. The CASE electronic version lists both cylinders, but there are limitations to the printed military manuals. It is possible that if your SEE had a cylinder replaced with one of these newer cylinders, then the listed seal kits will not work. In these situations I can't see how to identify the cylinder externally from the parts manuals, but perhaps the part number of the cylinder is cast into it. The dealer should be able to look up that cylinder part number and get you the seal kit for it.
 

hrbergeron

Well-known member
247
288
63
Location
Yorktown, VA
Hello all, new unimog owner. Got it from a military surplus dealer in Indiana. FLU419 SEE. Located in Virginia, USA. If needed, you can PM me for contact details. I started another thread for mine because this one is not only years old but spans several hundred pages.

uni.jpg
 

rtrask

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
300
126
43
Location
San Luis Valley, Colorado
Hello all, new unimog owner. Got it from a military surplus dealer in Indiana. FLU419 SEE. Located in Virginia, USA. If needed, you can PM me for contact details. I started another thread for mine because this one is not only years old but spans several hundred pages.

View attachment 724344
Welcome to the group. This is the best thread because it is the one that is most closely monitored. Which is why it is so long. Lots of good info here, but sometimes you have to dig.

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anthkey

Member
98
7
8
Location
Cumming ga
Last year the bucket controls worked just fine...
went to scrape the garden, they are binding together.. it's not the valves ,
it seems to be in the shaft they are all attached too...
any input???? yes I greased it....aua
 
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alpine44

Member
392
7
18
Location
Asheville, NC - Elkton, MD
Last year the bucket controls worked just fine...
went to scrape the garden, they are binding together.. it's not the valves ,
it seems to be in the shaft they are all attached too...
any input???? yes I greased it....aua
Try penetrating oil to free the lever bushings from the shaft and check that the push-pull rods are not binding together from a cotter pin that walked out or something that fell in there. Also do some preventative maintenance on the backhoe levers as they suffer from the same problems if the machine is left outside in the elements.
 
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The FLU farm

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
3,037
592
113
Location
The actual midwest, NM.
Last year the bucket controls worked just fine...
went to scrape the garden, they are binding together.. it's not the valves ,
it seems to be in the shaft they are all attached too...
any input???? yes I greased it....aua
That's close to what happened to one outrigger lever on mine last fall. It's not that it affects the lever next to it, but all of a sudden it didn't want to move much.
So it was not after the machine had been sitting for a while.

Haven't got around to figuring out the cause yet, so now I'm awaiting your troubleshooting, and solution.
 

MrSEE

Member
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0
6
Location
Billings, MT
Could definitely be crusty linkages leading to the loader control valve body. I think I have 2 or 3 extra loader control/lever assemblies. Let me know if you need one. I know it's been awhile guys - I've had no SEEs to work on! Check "parts for sale" as I'm dumping SEE stuff pretty cheap.
 

anthkey

Member
98
7
8
Location
Cumming ga
Try penetrating oil to free the lever bushings from the shaft and check that the push-pull rods are not binding together from a cotter pin that walked out or something that fell in there. Also do some preventative maintenance on the backhoe levers as they suffer from the same problems if the machine is left outside in the elements.
I Did that also... time to tear it apart....:shock:
 

anthkey

Member
98
7
8
Location
Cumming ga
Last year the bucket controls worked just fine...
went to scrape the garden, they are binding together.. it's not the valves ,
it seems to be in the shaft they are all attached too...
any input???? yes I greased it....aua
well the problem was not inside the cab...
the connecting rod was locked up...

frozen shaft1.JPG
but the exhaust was in the way...
frozen shaft 2.JPG
so I chose to remove it rather than remove the plate holding the hydraulic valves...
locked solid...
frozen shaft3.JPG
 

alpine44

Member
392
7
18
Location
Asheville, NC - Elkton, MD
Congrats. It's always a good feeling having found the problem.
As far as the solution is concerned: Use penetrating oil and slightly peen the outer tube to free the inner shaft. Put the tube on an anvil and hammer on the tube while turning the tube and moving it lengthwise under the hammer. This will slightly enlarge the tube diameter and the shaft will come free. Then use waterproof bearing grease, available at a marine store, to prevent reoccurence of the problem.
 
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alpine44

Member
392
7
18
Location
Asheville, NC - Elkton, MD
I spent the last two days freeing up all the shafts and pins on the backhoe in preparation for some hydraulic cylinder resealing. There was very little if any wear on the pins and bushings but the decades of outside storage had caused most pins to be rusted tight in their bores. It was a bear of a job to get some of them loose. I did not need to resort to using the "blue wrench" but a big sledgehammer was definitely needed and a lathe to clean up some of the slightly mushroomed ends.

Do yourself a favor, treat the backhoe pins with penetrating oil for weeks and get them out before you need them to come out. The longer you wait the more painful will the removal be. Again, water-proof grease is your friend.
 
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msharky007

Member
32
0
6
Location
San Antonio, Texas
I spent the last two days freeing up all the shafts and pins on the backhoe in preparation for some hydraulic cylinder resealing. There was very little if any wear on the pins and bushings but the decades of outside storage had caused most pins to be rusted tight in their bores. It was a bear of a job to get some of them loose. I did not need to resort to using the "blue wrench" but a big sledgehammer was definitely needed and a lathe to clean up some of the slightly mushroomed ends.

Do yourself a favor, treat the backhoe pins with penetrating oil for weeks and get them out before you need them to come out. The longer you wait the more painful will the removal be. Again, water-proof grease is your friend.
Just did it myself, I know

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alpine44

Member
392
7
18
Location
Asheville, NC - Elkton, MD
Removing FOPS without additional crane or hoist

Figured out a way to remove the FOPS (falling object protection system) roof above the cab with the backhoe itself.

This method is neither mentioned nor endorsed in any TM, not OSHA approved, and may harm/kill you and/or your FLU419. Use at your own risk.

20180411_133953.jpg 20180411_134648.jpg 20180411_134740.jpg 20180411_134940.jpg 20180411_135229.jpg

Here is how I got the ROPS off and to the ground:

The backhoe bucket had to be removed. Otherwise, there was too much weight on the extended dipper and the backhoe would not tilt back to the working position.

1) Locked the backhoe boom and swung it to the passenger side as usual but extended the dipper fully.
2) Lifted the outriggers off the ground but did not pull them up all the way. This provided some counterweight for the extended dipper.
3) Tilted the backhoe towards the travel position until the eye on the dipper was roughly in line with the lifting ears on the FOPS.
4) Used chains/straps to tie the FOPS to the dipper. In the future, I will use a shackle on the dipper eye as the angle will change significantly and hooks could slide off.
5) Took up the slack and unbolted the FOPS from the roll bar.
6) Tilted the backhoe to lift the FOPS up and guided it out of the way around the spark arestor/muffler.
7) Continued to tilt the backhoe all the way to the working position, locked it, and lowered the outriggers.
9) Moved the dipper down until the FOPS was on the ground next to the FLU419
 
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msharky007

Member
32
0
6
Location
San Antonio, Texas
Removing FOPS without additional crane or hoist

Figured out a way to remove the FOPS (falling object protection system) roof above the cab with the backhoe itself.

This method is neither mentioned nor endorsed in any TM, not OSHA approved, and may harm/kill you and/or your FLU419. Use at your own risk.

View attachment 724946 View attachment 724947 View attachment 724948 View attachment 724949 View attachment 724950

Here is how I got the ROPS off and to the ground:

The backhoe bucket had to be removed. Otherwise, there was too much weight on the extended dipper and the backhoe would not tilt back to the working position.

1) Locked the backhoe boom and swung it to the passenger side as usual but extended the dipper fully.
2) Lifted the outriggers off the ground but did not pull them up all the way. This provided some counterweight for the extended dipper.
3) Tilted the backhoe towards the travel position until the eye on the dipper was roughly in line with the lifting ears on the FOPS.
4) Used chains/straps to tie the FOPS to the dipper. In the future, I will use a shackle on the dipper eye as the angle will change significantly and hooks could slide off.
5) Took up the slack and unbolted the FOPS from the roll bar.
6) Tilted the backhoe to lift the FOPS up and guided it out of the way around the spark arestor/muffler.
7) Continued to tilt the backhoe all the way to the working position, locked it, and lowered the outriggers.
9) Moved the dipper down until the FOPS was on the ground next to the FLU419
Brilliant

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Toolee

New member
16
0
1
Location
Washington
Nice! This gives me hope that lifting the spare into place with the backhoe is doable.
...and speaking of tires, I have a chance at some Michelin XM47 tires for my SEE, but the tire man is balking at the 405/70R20 size. I have seen multiple references to folks on the Benzworld forum with this size on the stock 11" wheels on a plain old (such a thing?) 406, and a couple of places in this forum where XM47s were mentioned. My problems is that I cannot see where anyone has said, "Oh, yes--that 405 width works fine on my SEE's 11-inch stock wheels; no rubbing at all."
Do any of you have a definitive answer?
 

alpine44

Member
392
7
18
Location
Asheville, NC - Elkton, MD
...and speaking of tires, I have a chance at some Michelin XM47 tires for my SEE, but the tire man is balking at the 405/70R20 size. I have seen multiple references to folks on the Benzworld forum with this size on the stock 11" wheels on a plain old (such a thing?) 406, and a couple of places in this forum where XM47s were mentioned. My problems is that I cannot see where anyone has said, "Oh, yes--that 405 width works fine on my SEE's 11-inch stock wheels; no rubbing at all."
Do any of you have a definitive answer?
No definite answer for the tires you mentioned but have another data point that may help.
I am currently running Michelin 14.5R20 XL (43.5" dia 14.4" width) tires on stock rims and they rub slightly on the anti sway bar in the front. I also removed the front fenders to avoid a cab lift.
The 405/70R20 XM47 (42.6" dia 15.6" width) will most likely require some additional effort like wheel spacers.
Another candidate would be the 380/75R20 XMCL (42.1" dia 15.1" width) tires currently surplused on IP.
I was contemplating to use the XMCL tires myself but their load ratings at speeds higher than a crawl are dismal and one of the reasons for getting a FLU419 was to move around locally without having to trailer. The XM47 are better in this regard.
Due to the reduced load rating at road speeds and the $$$$ required for the ag tires, I decided to solve the traction problem in mud with heavy duty Pewag A05SV chains. These chains are sold as surplus for about $160 a pair and fit the 14.5R20 XL tires nicely. Easy to mount/remove and great traction in conditions like wet clay where the XLs become slicks.

20180122_160923.jpg 20180122_160832.jpg
 
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