FLU419 SEE HMMH HME Owners group

glcaines

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There's a lot of unusual stuff hiding under the dirt sometimes.

Ever dig up something interesting, something you didn't expect?
The only thing I've seen around here are rocks and some Cherokee Indian artifacts. When I was in the Army stationed in Germany, another guy and I dug up a human skull, most likely from WWII. This was near Giessen during a NATO alert in 1970 and was only about 3 - 4 inches deep. Strangely, there was only the skull, no other bones, but the skull was in good condition. The German police were called and they took the skull away. No idea if it was German or Allies.
 

Guyfang

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When I worked for a large construction firm here, lots of stuff was dug up, and lots of stuff was reburied, since the proclaiming of, "We found................." would bring the work to a standstill. So as long as everyone kept his mouth shut, work went on. In the early 70's, on our Hawk Missile site, I used to take out 2.5 cubic front end loader out to play. Dig holes, and cover them up. Lots of Germany is sand. Easy to dig in. Often, I came up with "stuff". PSP from the old landing strip. Cars, trucks and odds and ends of Quad fifty units, and Hawk parts. All kinds of "stuff". Then one day I brought up about 500 rounds of .50 cal, tracer rounds. My CWO told me to "quick, bury that shi*." Chief should have known better. I took it back to our party house. We thought long and hard of what to do with it. So, New Years, 1974, we set up shop. After a few beers and a bowl or two, we pulled out the slugs. They are hollow. Full of stuff that burns. That's what you see when the rounds are flying. Then we poured all the powder into several large containers. Shortly before midnight, fortified with more beers and bowls, we crept out of the house. 4-5 doors down lived the "High Mayor" of Bamberg. And made about a million small piles of powder. It was at least 30 meters long. Put a round in every pile, and laid a powder train between all the little piles of power. At the stroke of midnight, my buddy Carlos, (from Peru) lit THE MATCH. He touched it to the power train, and the light show began! Better then watching TV! The flame raced from one end of the powder train to the other in about 3 nano seconds. Each pile flamed up about two feet high, and THEN the slugs started to shoot flame out the rear of the slug, about 2 feet long. Spinning around like mad lightning bugs. The Lord High Mayor was not amused. When the cops arrived, we were half way into town, to continue the party.
 

Another Ahab

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Alexandria, VA
When I worked for a large construction firm here, lots of stuff was dug up, and lots of stuff was reburied, since the proclaiming of, "We found................." would bring the work to a standstill.
Us "Constructoids", we all got stories, Guyfang, right?

I used to work for a big international builder, J.A. Jones Construction (headquartered in Charlotte NC, USA).

People within the company moved around and worked in different cities even different countries, but only ONE group of people was allowed to work projects in New York City (NYC). I learned why later, working a job in D.C. with a job superintendent who was one from that Manhattan (NYC) group.

He told me the story when he was a younger guy on one of those NYC jobs (some highrise midtown), that one morning at Zero Dark-Thirty while showing up for work that day the workers found a body on the jobsite. Somebody had been murdered there, apparently overnight:

- The Superintendent had no intention of interfering with the criminal investigation, but that project (like all projects) was on a schedule, and he was NOT going to let a murder investigation shut down his job

- He gloved up some tradesmen, had them carry the body across the street (OFF his project), and THEN contacted the police

NYC was its own particular work environment, and the company had its unwritten rules for how to operate there.

Crazy, right?
 

Speedwoble

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New Holland, PA
I started de-rusting my current 160ATSA195 Oregon bar that came on the chainsaw and which is the correct bar. The bar has damage from the jack hammer laying on top of it. I've now trashed it. As I mentioned, Oregon has no records of manufacturing this model. I talked to someone else at Oregon and they told me the military specified this bar and it was discontinued many years ago and was never sold on the civilian market. I found another Oregon bar, 160PXDK095, which is identical with the original except it has a sprocket on the end of the bar. The original has a hardened insert on the bar end and no sprocket. I found one on Ebay, new but open box, for $30.00. I've already received it. It works fine, but Oregon Customer Service has informed me that it is a discontinued product. The next problem is the chain. My original chain is in good condition, but I wanted to go ahead and get a spare. The problem with the chain is that it was discontinued as well due to the short length of 59 links. You can always get one made from a long chain shortened to the correct length. I found a place on Amazon that had a 72V059G chain the correct length and specs. I ordered the last one. Oregon told me the 72V059G chain is being discontinued as well. The specs for the bar and chain are as follows.
Length: 16 Inches
Gauge: 0.050
Pitch: 3/8 Inch (Must be 72 Series Chain)
Links: 59
One can always replace the original 16 Inch bar with a longer bar, such as an 18 Inch bar, for a Model CS06 Stanley saw in which case the bars and chains are readily available. However, with the longer bar, the saw won't fit properly inside the space provided in the plastic storage tray located in the bottom of the SEE storage cabinet, probably not important to most. I also tried to buy a new plastic sheath for the chainsaw bar. It isn't available. It was thin plastic and special ordered by the military so that the bar would fit inside the plastic tray. The 16 Inch civilian ones are readily available, but are thick plastic which precludes using it with the storage tray.

By the way, Oregon Customer Service has now temporarily shut down due to the proximity of fires in the area.
View attachment 812087
I have 2 of the Stanley chainsaws, one came with my FLU, and one was bought from a forum member. Both green and having the FLU hydraulic quick connects.
Based on this forum and looking at the saw on my FLU, I bought a 3/8 pitch 24” bar and chain intending to put the longer bar on my spare saw for some big logs I am working on. Quite a disappointment when I took it off the shelf and found that the spare saw is a 0.325” pitch. I am going to see if I can find a 3/8” pitch sprocket for the spare saw since I already have several spare 3/8” blades for the 16”.
The saw that came with my FLU has a Stanley model number CS06**(I think CS06SM?) It has the 3/8” pitch chain and the bar with the hardened end rather than a sprocket.
The other one I bought has a model number CS06, a 0.325 pitch chain and an Oregon bar with a sprocket at the end.

Just a note to verify your pitch.
 

Speedwoble

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try a real logger supply. if you know the pitch and number of links getting chain isn't a problem. neither is the bar.
I didn’t realize we had an expert. Since you are blessing us with knowledge, can you share the pitch and number of links we need?
The issue is not getting the parts. The issue is assuming that all FLU chainsaws are the same. As I found out, not all of them are 3/8” pitch. Check before ordering.
 

justacitizen

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oklahoma
I didn’t realize we had an expert. Since you are blessing us with knowledge, can you share the pitch and number of links we need?
The issue is not getting the parts. The issue is assuming that all FLU chainsaws are the same. As I found out, not all of them are 3/8” pitch. Check before ordering.

it's not that difficult smart ass! you can figure it out for yourself
 

glcaines

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Hiawassee, Georgia
The Stanley saw in my FLU419 is a Model CS06120M, S/N 1289M. The bar that came on the chainsaw was an Oregon 30959 GA 160ATSA195, P/N 09588. According to Oregon, they have no records regarding Oregon manufacturing this particular bar even though it has an Oregon logo printed on the side in large letters. I had to replace the original bar because the original was in extremely bad shape. I talked with several dealers for both Stanley and Oregon and received conflicting information and finally contacted both Stanley and Oregon corporate offices, both of which were very helpful. The data stamped on the original Oregon bar is as follows.

Model: 30959 GA 160ATSA195, P/N 09588
16: Meaning 16 inch bar
0: Meaning gauge 0.050
AT: Meaning solid nose w/wear resistant alloy tip
S: Meaning small nose radius of 1.12 inches
A195: Meaning the particular way the bar mounts to the saw (A195 is a Stanley Mount Bar but it also used on a very few other models)

The data stamped on the original chain is as follows
0.050: Gauge

3/8: Pitch
72: Series 72
59: Number of links
25: Unknown meaning

I discussed my chainsaw with Stanley and they were very familiar with the saw. However, Stanley didn't have a clue about the bar or chain that came on the saw except that it should be 3/8 pitch. After discussing with Oregon, they recommended an Oregon commercial bar, Catalog: 160PXDK095 and an Oregon chain, Catalog: 72V059G. This bar has a sprocket on the end instead of the hardened nose like the original. I found the new Oregon bar on Ebay and the new Oregon chain on Amazon. My chainsaw now runs very well and fits nicely in the holder in the bottom of the tool cabinet.
 

Speedwoble

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If you have a CS06120M, it came with a 3/8” pitch chain of 59 links. Since the military model was apparently a short production run, it is possible some may be equipped with a CS06 which is 0.325” pitch and 64 links. If you have a CS06, you can convert it to 3/8 with an Oregon 18720 sprocket, which is a 7T 3/8” small 7 spline. It is also the part number in the PDF manual. The nut is LH thread. Here is mine running a 24” bar and an 84 link 3/8” chain.
240RNDK095 OREGON.
The replacement 0.325” rim sprocket for the CS06 is an Oregon 11892.
551021BD-D0C5-4A41-ADFC-8BFAFCE75B21.jpeg
 

glcaines

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Hiawassee, Georgia
I like the longer bar you have. I noticed that your saw doesn't have a bucking cleat installed. Did it come with one? I also noticed that the civilian model of the CS06 saw doesn't have the long flat spike piece mounted under the bucking cleat. Apparently, that was only put on the military version. Here is a photo of mine showing the bucking cleat. Have you used yours? I'm amazed at the power of that CS06 saw. I especially like the extremely light weight compared to my Stihl gas saws.

Bucking Cleat.JPG
 

Speedwoble

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New Holland, PA
I like the longer bar you have. I noticed that your saw doesn't have a bucking cleat installed. Did it come with one? I also noticed that the civilian model of the CS06 saw doesn't have the long flat spike piece mounted under the bucking cleat. Apparently, that was only put on the military version. Here is a photo of mine showing the bucking cleat. Have you used yours? I'm amazed at the power of that CS06 saw. I especially like the extremely light weight compared to my Stihl gas saws.
If this is the flat spike piece you speak of, it looks like the plastic hand-guard on yours is broken. Part number 07473(check the Flu manual to verify) is available for a reasonable price online.
4268E1AA-DB76-4A7E-80A6-1D41EB2CAB5D.jpeg3BAF8058-B0B3-44DF-9EDC-B59A5DE2C26E.jpeg2B6021A4-F9BF-4F2F-9BBC-81E08DC585E9.jpeg
I do really like the chainsaw. It is powerful, light, and quiet. Also the oiling is pretty simple. I am curious how it will do with the larger bar.
 

glcaines

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Hiawassee, Georgia
Mine really puts out the oil, so I think you will probably be OK with the longer bar. One nice thing about a longer bar is that the chain is obviously longer and stays sharper longer since there are more teeth. You are correct about the hand guard. I was looking at the saw upside down in the tool box and didn't pay attention.
Edit: I've now ordered a replacement hand guard. Brand new from Stanley for a little more than $13.00!
 
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Brents347

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Location
Truckee, CA.
Here’s a question I haven’t found the answer to yet. The little alarm horn inside the cab, mounted to the dash down by the hand throttle, what is it triggered by? Trying to figure out how to get mine to work. i removed the old horn and it makes no noise when jumped straight to the battery so I’m calling it dead. But when I check the power leads that went to this horn, they have 24volts full time. So if I replace the horn it’s just going to scream at me all the time? I am assuming that this is a high temp/low oil pressure type alarm. Is that right?
thanks guys!

Brent
 

Brents347

New member
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3
Location
Truckee, CA.
Here’s a question I haven’t found the answer to yet. The little alarm horn inside the cab, mounted to the dash down by the hand throttle, what is it triggered by? Trying to figure out how to get mine to work. i removed the old horn and it makes no noise when jumped straight to the battery so I’m calling it dead. But when I check the power leads that went to this horn, they have 24volts full time. So if I replace the horn it’s just going to scream at me all the time? I am assuming that this is a high temp/low oil pressure type alarm. Is that right?
thanks guys!

Brent
I think I just answered my own question. I came across an old post from FluFarm where he said that his in-cab alarm went off until the truck built up sufficient air pressure. Since I am currently working out a no-air situation, that would explain the circuit having full time power. Live and learn!
 

Brents347

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Location
Truckee, CA.
Well, I’ve gotten through reading about 1/2 this thread, so I figure it’s time to introduce myself.

So, I’m Brents347 (Brent), from Truckee, CA. and we’ve got an ’89 FLU that we bought from a private owner in about 2017.

In the time we’ve had it, ive gone through a bit of stuff on the truck, and have much more stuff to do. I seem to have gotten lucky in that all the electrical is intact and operational. I had to replace the hydro cooler fans and temp senders, and the rear alarm horn (back by the backhoe switches). Rebuilt a couple of the hydraulic rams for leaking seals, and had to put tires on it due to dry rot.

I’ve driven the Mog all around my town. I used for the Little League parade one year for my sons baseball team. Towed a big military ammunition trailer behind it with all the players in the trailer. The kids loved it. I remember driving through town and there a small business owner in front of his business trying to shovel a snow plow berm, so I dropped the bucket and cleared it for him in one swipe. He was happy! Probably the funniest was seeing my Mog on Facebook after I drove it to the local coffee shop to grab a cup. Someone loved it so much the6 took a picture of it and posted it and it took about 30 before someone sent me the link.

My Mog lives on our property pretty much full time now, but in its road time it topped out at about 52 mph. Not too bad, and it is super stable at that speed. The furthest I drove it was about 90 miles each way to Sierra army depot to pick up the ammo trailer I bought at auction. Towed the trailer home with lights, but without the air brakes. I went nice and slow because the trailer weighs about 16,500lbs. empty.

And lastly, here’s a couple of pictures of the Mog on the property.

Me playing
FFDC24D6-A88B-469E-9002-A03914DC5EBD.jpeg
And the day I accidently tipped over the Mog in an underground electrical ditch that I had dug and was in the process of back filling. I couldn’t use the backhoe to right the FLU because it was retracted and the truck was laying on the controls to lower the hoe so I winched it back on its wheels with an F350. Once the passanger wheels were touching the ground the truck was still really close to the tipping point. The tilt gauge was at about 33 degrees, but I was able to drive it out of the ditch! These are amazing little vehicles!
08DF75B6-B179-4D51-A1FA-8468176334B1.jpeg
 
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