FMTV door handle/Lock How to make Keys or have the proper ones made.

sgtinf

New member
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Location
hagerstown MD
Making Keys to the FMTV or Any Other Vehicle.
We are focusing on the FMTV. It was made by BAE Systems Land and Armaments, then in 2011 switched to Oshkosh Corporation. First look at the door handle and the lock where you insert the key. Sometimes there’s some letters and number, a local LMTV made by international had a little picture of a key on one side of the key slot, then TM202. The TM202 was the key code. I have a computer program called InstaCode. I run the key code through it and it tells me all the choices for a key. It’s broke down by manufacturer and application. So there’s still a little guess work but nothing bad.
For the FMTV in this case, the door handle needed to be removed. You will have to remove the inside door panel (inside door handle, window crank, armrest… anything that’s stopping you from removing the door panel). Once that’s removed you should be able to see inside the door cavity. At this point you can look at the back of the lock and see if you can see the key code. It’s on a piece that looks like a fat arrow head. There is a white plastic piece next to it. The key code was KA0## the code is 2 letters and 3 numbers. Yours may have more numbers behind it. If you don’t see it, then continue to remove the handle/lock assembly. Be sure to discount the linkage going to the handle and lock (two rods). Then undo the one 10mm nut holding in the door handle. The handle and lock will rotate out of the door.
With the handle assembly in your hand you should be able to see the key code. If there is not one you will need to take the whole assembly to a locksmith (or send it to me, as I’m a locksmith). They will impression a key to it or, on this one, there’s a slot where you can see all the wafers and then sight-cut a key to it. If you’re worried about getting the right key cut for your code, then take the handle/lock with you. They can try the key blanks in the lock before they cut it to make sure they have the right code. It turns out that the FMTV lock was a Volvo series. I ended up using a Ilco x29 key blank. The key blank also fits VOLVO 1973-77 142 144 240 1800 DELOREAN. I would never have guessed that without having the lock in my hand to try the blanks in. Also, with the military they liked one key to work all the vehicles. Don’t worry. These locks can be fully disassembled and rekeyed by moving the wafers around or replacing the wafers. The lock only has 6 wafers in it, so it’s ok on security. The newer civilian Fords have 10 wafers in them. I’m sure I have left something out if you have any question’s please ask.



 
Last edited:

coachgeo

Well-known member
3,410
448
83
Location
North of Cincy OH
Making Keys to the FMTV or Any Other Vehicle.
We are focusing on the FMTV. It was made by BAE Systems Land and Armaments, then in 2011 switched to Oshkosh Corporation. First look at the door handle and the lock where you insert the key. Sometimes there’s some letters and number, a local LMTV made by international had a little picture of a key on one side of the key slot, then TM202. The TM202 was the key code. I have a computer program called InstaCode. I run the key code through it and it tells me all the choices for a key. It’s broke down by manufacturer and application. So there’s still a little guess work but nothing bad.
For the FMTV in this case, the door handle needed to be removed. You will have to remove the inside door panel (inside door handle, window crank, armrest… anything that’s stopping you from removing the door panel). Once that’s removed you should be able to see inside the door cavity. At this point you can look at the back of the lock and see if you can see the key code. It’s on a piece that looks like a fat arrow head. There is a white plastic piece next to it. The key code was KA0## the code is 2 letters and 3 numbers. Yours may have more numbers behind it. If you don’t see it, then continue to remove the handle/lock assembly. Be sure to discount the linkage going to the handle and lock (two rods). Then undo the one 10mm nut holding in the door handle. The handle and lock will rotate out of the door.
With the handle assembly in your hand you should be able to see the key code. If there is not one you will need to take the whole assembly to a locksmith (or send it to me, as I’m a locksmith). They will impression a key to it or, on this one, there’s a slot where you can see all the wafers and then sight-cut a key to it. If you’re worried about getting the right key cut for your code, then take the handle/lock with you. They can try the key blanks in the lock before they cut it to make sure they have the right code. It turns out that the FMTV lock was a Volvo series. I ended up using a Ilco x29 key blank. The key blank also fits VOLVO 1973-77 142 144 240 1800 DELOREAN. I would never have guessed that without having the lock in my hand to try the blanks in. Also, with the military they liked one key to work all the vehicles. Don’t worry. These locks can be fully disassembled and rekeyed by moving the wafers around or replacing the wafers. The lock only has 6 wafers in it, so it’s ok on security. The newer civilian Fords have 10 wafers in them. I’m sure I have left something out if you have any question’s please ask.
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archiving pics in this thread here in SS before photobucket.... kicks the bucket. added into copy of original post
 

B-Dog

Member
60
62
18
Location
Denver, CO
Hey Chris, I have an LMTV here with a locked drivers door and no keys. I'll get the doors taken apart at some point and be contacting you. Thanks for posting this!!
 

Niuhi

Member
30
11
8
Location
Shoreline WA
So perhaps just an FYI for those considering a re-key. I pulled mine and took them to one of our bigger locksmiths to have done. When I pulled them I found one of them wasn't an original, but a replacement. Now here's where things got difficult. The original lock had a key code stamped into the lock cylinder, while the replacement did not. It was a good code only the keyways were flipped on both locks. The original was easy, $25 for re-cut. The replacement was military (found on some random shelf goofiness). This one had to be pulled apart and rebuilt and would have been cheaper had I not wanted to key them the same. The other problem is its built like it were Chinese manufacturing, looks good, but built sloppy. I was told the cylinders wafer were oversized, so it meant it could eventually become in operable, but right now it's a bit finicky. So with a total of $162 I can now drive it for a burger and not be in constant fear of hearing it take off without me 😄. Had this been the original lock, I would imagine having this done would be around $40. Hopefully that helps the next newbie.
 
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