M1008 Flat Towing Axle Removal?

CivilEGR

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Detroit, MI
I've been looking into this a little bit and would like to know what you do once you pull the axle out of the U-joint container. Do you just wire the axle up under the truck, or do you pull it from the back of the transfer case? Do you cover the U-joint caps at all?
 

snowtrac nome

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you must be talking about the drive shaft and the container is called a yoke. if you are flat towing there is no need for this just put your transfer case in neutral. if you insist on removing the drive line, it must all come out and a plug stuck in the transfer case
 

dependable

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You can securely tape the U joint end and wire up drive shaft if you have no way to plug output shaft hole in transfer case. Just make sure transfer case is in neutral and front hubs are disengaged. Did this a few times with older trucks that had U joints at both ends off rear drive shaft.

Not a fan of flat towing myself, except for very short distance, and even then...but I had my share of vehicular adventures, so don't let me discourage you from having yours.
 

Monkeyboyarmy

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I've towed many. If it is a long distance, I pull the driveshaft and typically use a small ratchet strap to tie it to the frame or mufflers. Wrap electrical tape around the joint so the caps don't get lost. You can also pull the whole driveshaft off by sliding the yoke out of the transfer case but you will lose some fluid. I've been told that the way you want to tow with the driveshaft installed is transmission in park and transfer case in neutral ,BUT putting the transfer case in neutral engages the front axle therefore spinning the front driveshaft and front differential. I also know towing like this for an extended time will heat that transfer case right up.
 

snowtrac nome

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i have done a lot of long distance flat tows with never a problem, unless you dont get the transfer case in neutral yes the hubs need to be unlocked if you were towing cross country i wold trailer it just because the load would handle it better, also when flat towing you want a 1 ton truck at min, and i would stick some ballast in the bed. you will need the weight to control the load
 

CivilEGR

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Detroit, MI
I guess my plan will be to town with a 1/2 truck, medium tow bar. Swap the tires back to the 235/85r16 road tires, put the off road tires in my bed for more weight on the towing vehicle. I'll put everything in neutral, unlock the steering, and unlock the hubs. I've got about 250 miles to go and I'm in no hurry.
 

cucvrus

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No need for a 1 ton truck. I towed many with 1/2 ton Chevy 4 x 4 pickups. Just done the dually for 150 miles. Monkeyboy is right. Driveshaft off and tied up hubs in neutral and no need to do anything with transfer case. Safety chain and tail lamps are all that is needed. I found the newer the truck the less issues I have. With the towing package my 1/2 tons do fine flat towing or trailer towing. DSCF7544.JPGDSCF7545.JPGDSCF3344.JPG
 

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CivilEGR

Member
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Detroit, MI
No need for a 1 ton truck. I towed many with 1/2 ton Chevy 4 x 4 pickups. Just done the dually for 150 miles. Monkeyboy is right. Driveshaft off and tied up hubs in neutral and no need to do anything with transfer case. Safety chain and tail lamps are all that is needed. I found the newer the truck the less issues I have. With the towing package my 1/2 tons do fine flat towing or trailer towing.
Awesome. Do you unlock the steering wheel as well?

All I need now is some feet and pins for the bar delivered by Friday and I'd be in good shape.
 

nyoffroad

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Rochester NY
Awesome. Do you unlock the steering wheel as well?
Yes, and another helpful hint. Don't get into a place where you have to back up! If you do try to keep it straight and even still you'll probably have to get out and turn the steering wheel on the towed to keep things lined up.
 

cucvrus

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I was at Aberdeen swap meet one year and after a few hours it was a sea of mud in the vendor field. I drove in before the rain started driving an M1028 with another M1028 in tow on the bar. I had the drive shaft removed when I arrived and when I got there it was not raining so I quick hooked up the drive shaft. I hooked it up so people that were interested in buying the trucks could drive them. By about 2PM on Saturday the rain did not let up and I seen people struggling in the mud. I re hooked my rigs together and made an attempt to get out of the quagmire. I could not even move. My Son was about 12 at the time so I started the rear truck and engaged the 4WDLO and told him to just throttle enough to follow me. It worked but it was a lot of fun for a 12 year old to over throttle and push me most of the way. We slung a lot of grassy mud and when we hit the hard road we left a mud trail several miles. I left the towed M1028 idle in neutral until I got to Conowingo Maryland and stopped at the boat ramp and disconnected the driveshaft after I backed into the boat launch a few times to get the mud from the vehicle. The road to the boat launch was under water so it made a great place to power thru deep water at speed and wash the mud out. Great fun. My Son still talks about it. So if you have to tow a few miles and the towing vehicle runs you can tow it idling in neutral with the rear drive shaft still in place. Good Luck.
 

Monkeyboyarmy

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Kingsville,Oh.
I have left a truck idling as well to keep the transmission lubricated when towing with the driveshaft in. Oh, and that reminds me, I left a m1009 idling while towing behind a m923 with wires hooked up from the blazer to the 5 ton because the charging system was out of it. It was only for 2 days tho lol.
 

2deuce

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portland, oregon
I just flat towed my dually M1028 home. I had forgot my magnetic lights so I had my son sit in the towed CUCV and touch the brakes when we needed to stop and use the blinker when we needed to turn. I always tie up the driveline(motorcycle strap wrapped around the mufflers, makes a nice bed for it) and leave the other end in the transfer case so nothing leaks out. Put some tape around the u-joint. That is all I have done, but would recommend also using a bungee to make sure the driveline doesn't work out of the transfer case. It started to once on a long trip. The longer and heavier your tow vehicle the better you will feel. If you have a trailer with brakes you are better off, because you won't get pushed as easily. I towed a trailer with a M1028 on it with a M1009, I had one event that was very bad. I was coming down Cabbage Hill by Pendleton, OR and decided to let her roll on the long straight run out. I was at 60 when a Semi was passing me and I had no control. It was a sunny dry hot day, but it felt like I was on ICE. I rode it out, could have put on some trailer brake but if one side pulled more than the other, it would not have been pretty. It felt like I had no steering. Whatever you do keep it slow.
 
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