Non-op compressor

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Retiredwarhorses

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So, I wired 24v to the compresso, it works...I get 24 volts to the fuse block, found the relay that the compressor switch goes too, it’s a 12v switch that activates the 24v relay. When the switch is activated, it kills the 12volts...I can hear and feel the relay opening and closing.
I also get no 24v at the power cable at the compressor....
damn I wish I had a schematic.
 

jmpogue89

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if you measure across a good fuse you get no voltage or little voltage reading. If the fuse is bad (open) you see source voltage (12/24)
 

W427

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perhaps I can just short the leads together to test...I’m assuming it’s a normally closed circuit, once it opens it kills the power to the relay, possibility it’s stuck open.
I know you're aware of much of this, but for others in similar situations — A cheap multi-meter ($10-$20 for most work like this) is your best friend for this type of diagnostic work, quick and much safer as well. Two concepts for finding clues; first of which is to begin at a point you find voltage or continuity, and follow it until the voltage or continuity is lost. There's your break. Don't know where the wire goes? Begin where you know it is, then (power off) probe for continuity where you think it should go until the meter beeps. That's it. For something like this, it would likely be to the fuse panel, pressure switch, relay, etc. When you find it, mark it or note it.

Second is individual component testing, where in this case you can check for continuity of the switch (is it working?). Then with power enabled; test for voltage on one pressure switch connection (did relay signal voltage get that far?), and for proper ground on the other. That's correct, and is only missing the switch closing to work. :) No need to take the time and cost to replace an item that tests good, so diagnostics can save a lot of money and frustration.

At that point you can try bridging the switch pins (bypass shorting) to function-test and confirm your disgnosis, which should operate the relay, powering the compressor. No joy? Then go back to step one and probe your way back to the relay in order to find the voltage break. If that's good, then from the relay to the compressor, and so on. Diagnostics are quick and efficient, costs nothing to test, and confirms your hunches or finds the real problem before spending more time or money chasing it. Go for it!
 

Retiredwarhorses

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Compressor fixed...bad relay, multi-meter found no output when voltage applied, if I jumped it, it came on.
$35 and all fixed...but it does not shut off now, so I’m looking for pressure switch wilspec 5200-189-0001
If I unplug the connector at the switch, it kills the pump.
 

W427

New member
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Location
Seattle, WA area
Compressor fixed...bad relay, multi-meter found no output when voltage applied, if I jumped it, it came on.
$35 and all fixed...but it does not shut off now, so I’m looking for pressure switch wilspec 5200-189-0001
If I unplug the connector at the switch, it kills the pump.
Congrats! I found several replacement pressure switches online from sources like Amazon. IIRC, spec is 80-on and 100-off, so an 80-100 or 85-105 normally-closed (NC) generic unit should do well for about $10. Adjustable units are also available, but I don't think there is much need for that adjustability.
 
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