Rust Holes! Question....

ramdough

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I am digging into an M1083.... not to be a show truck.

I found some rust holes. I wire brushed it and kept going. I then poked (not very hard) with a screw driver and it popped through.

this is passenger side rear under where the m16 mounts used to be.

I bought Ospho to convert it, but I am guessing this is more than a converter can do. I am worried this goes down into the seam.

Any thoughts on good but easy fix? This will be a shop kept truck, but will take it to the beach some and snow/salt at some point.

I greatly appreciate your input
 

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NDT

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I would grind away all rust until just shiny metal remains. Then fill the holes and the bare shiny steel area with JB Weld. Then coat the area with cold galvanize paint, then topcoat.
 

ramdough

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Thanks for the reply NDT! I think once I start cutting, the hole will end up about 6”x 1”.

There was some chemical in the passenger side locker that spilled. The locker bottom was dust and even the screws that hold it down are now round nubs. I plan to ospho the bolt heads, but the sheet metal in the picture is a bunch of flakes.


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NDT

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Ouch, your picture didn't make it look that bad. Now you are faced with the misery of welding in a patch panel.
 

ramdough

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I am guessing that I will need to use a screw driver to feel how much of the metal is super soft....keep pressing until it does not pop through, then start cutting.


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ramdough

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Ouch, your picture didn't make it look that bad. Now you are faced with the misery of welding in a patch panel.
Ok, slow update. Cut out the rest of the gun mount.
It looks like there were two sheets of metal on the bottom, but the top sheep flaked off. The bottom looks fine. Also used a white wheel and screw driver to remove anything I could. The hood liner is still trapping crud in the hole, so the hole bottom looks bad.
 

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Bill Nutting

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It would be easier to asses the damage if I could see more of it. Maybe take a picture from a little further back. The way I fix this kind of rust damage is to cut out rusty metal until I get to solid metal. Then I lay a piece of clear plastic sheet over the hole and trace the hole on to the plastic sheet. Next I cut out the plastic sheet and use this to trace on to a new piece of sheet metal. I cut the sheet metal so it fits tight in the hole. Then hold the patch in place with a magnet and tack it in with a MiG welder. Then I remove the magnet and finish tacking in the patch. I use very small tacks and move around the patch so I don’t over heat it and cause it to warp. Then I use a small disc sander to grind down the welds. Prime and paint it... I takes some time and patience but the result is a patch that maintains the integrity of the steel. As soon as I feel myself trying to hurry up, I stop and come back to it the next day. It saves me a lot of time when I go slow.
 

ramdough

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Location
Austin, Texas
It would be easier to asses the damage if I could see more of it. Maybe take a picture from a little further back. The way I fix this kind of rust damage is to cut out rusty metal until I get to solid metal. Then I lay a piece of clear plastic sheet over the hole and trace the hole on to the plastic sheet. Next I cut out the plastic sheet and use this to trace on to a new piece of sheet metal. I cut the sheet metal so it fits tight in the hole. Then hold the patch in place with a magnet and tack it in with a MiG welder. Then I remove the magnet and finish tacking in the patch. I use very small tacks and move around the patch so I don’t over heat it and cause it to warp. Then I use a small disc sander to grind down the welds. Prime and paint it... I takes some time and patience but the result is a patch that maintains the integrity of the steel. As soon as I feel myself trying to hurry up, I stop and come back to it the next day. It saves me a lot of time when I go slow.
This is what the underside looks like.
 

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ramdough

Active member
703
158
43
Location
Austin, Texas
It would be easier to asses the damage if I could see more of it. Maybe take a picture from a little further back. The way I fix this kind of rust damage is to cut out rusty metal until I get to solid metal. Then I lay a piece of clear plastic sheet over the hole and trace the hole on to the plastic sheet. Next I cut out the plastic sheet and use this to trace on to a new piece of sheet metal. I cut the sheet metal so it fits tight in the hole. Then hold the patch in place with a magnet and tack it in with a MiG welder. Then I remove the magnet and finish tacking in the patch. I use very small tacks and move around the patch so I don’t over heat it and cause it to warp. Then I use a small disc sander to grind down the welds. Prime and paint it... I takes some time and patience but the result is a patch that maintains the integrity of the steel. As soon as I feel myself trying to hurry up, I stop and come back to it the next day. It saves me a lot of time when I go slow.
thanks for your advice and help!
 
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