Rust is the enemy!

1love

Member
64
36
18
Location
CA
Hey SS,

Perhaps some of you fine fellows and ladies can help me, I would like to coat my under body before the rust gets any worse. I know I have to remove the rust but what has been a proven method that works? 1: Remove rust with sand paper or wire wheel. 2: coat it with? 3: Then paint it? Any help will be great! I will add pictures of my new M1009 once I get it I just want to prepare and make it my DD.

passenger frt inner fender well.jpgdriver side floor under 2.jpg

driverside rear wheel well.jpg
 

cucvrus

Well-known member
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Jonestown Pennsylvania
That is beyond just wire brushing and coating. If you have the time it would be best to thoroughly power wash and get under there and clean up everything you can. Using wire wheels and sand paper will help a great deal. But keep in mind. Rust is like an iceberg you only see what is on the surface. And in this case there is much hidden below the surface that can not be reached. These old trucks were rust problems from day 1. Anything thing you do to slow its decay is a plus. But you will never stop it. Do the best you can with what you have and that is about all you can do. If you are real energetic you could remove the body from the frame and have the bottom side powder blasted and coated but as I stated the internal rust has a permanent hold and remains hungry and eats every time it gets moisture. Good Luck. Do your best clean it up and slow it down. On the inner fender aprons I would just replace them and coat the new ones thoroughly before installation. Good Luck.
 

Sharecropper

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
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Location
Paris KY
This is the best stuff I have ever used. On all my parts, I usually media-blast them in my cabinet and then immediately spray them down with this product. The liquid runs into every nook and cranny. I wipe off the excess and allow them to thoroughly dry and then spray prime them with red oxide primer. If I am trying to fill in a few pits or small dings, I will spray additional coats, sanding in between each coat. When the surface is flat with no imperfections, I then spray the color. Hope this helps.

IMG_4184.jpg
 

1love

Member
64
36
18
Location
CA
This is the best stuff I have ever used. On all my parts, I usually media-blast them in my cabinet and then immediately spray them down with this product. The liquid runs into every nook and cranny. I wipe off the excess and allow them to thoroughly dry and then spray prime them with red oxide primer. If I am trying to fill in a few pits or small dings, I will spray additional coats, sanding in between each coat. When the surface is flat with no imperfections, I then spray the color. Hope this helps.

Thanks! Big time helps!!! I knew there was some paint or process so your post helped BIG time thank you!!! You Da Man!!!
 

1love

Member
64
36
18
Location
CA
That is beyond just wire brushing and coating. If you have the time it would be best to thoroughly power wash and get under there and clean up everything you can. Using wire wheels and sand paper will help a great deal. But keep in mind. Rust is like an iceberg you only see what is on the surface. And in this case there is much hidden below the surface that can not be reached. These old trucks were rust problems from day 1. Anything thing you do to slow its decay is a plus. But you will never stop it. Do the best you can with what you have and that is about all you can do. If you are real energetic you could remove the body from the frame and have the bottom side powder blasted and coated but as I stated the internal rust has a permanent hold and remains hungry and eats every time it gets moisture. Good Luck. Do your best clean it up and slow it down. On the inner fender aprons I would just replace them and coat the new ones thoroughly before installation. Good Luck.

Cheese and Rice! I would love to powder coat the frame but that would require a larger garage which I'm limited at the moment =[. is there any areas you suggest I pay closer attention to on the cab? I say the frame is good it's just the cab I know that will need some touching up and whatnot. Thanks for the input and help.
 

Skinny

Well-known member
1,897
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Location
Portsmouth, NH
This is great shape for where I live.

Wire wheel on surface rust. Prime, paint, then apply oil. No rubberized undercoat garbage.

Fender is going to need a welder or panel replacement.

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
 

1love

Member
64
36
18
Location
CA
This is great shape for where I live.

Wire wheel on surface rust. Prime, paint, then apply oil. No rubberized undercoat garbage.

Fender is going to need a welder or panel replacement.

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk


Correct no rubber undercoating I've heard the horror stories online about the rust building under the rubber. Does anyone have a quart panel for sale:)?
 

cucvrus

Well-known member
9,271
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Location
Jonestown Pennsylvania
Rusfre.jpg
Call this what you want but I have used it for over 40 years and have had great results. I started using it at the GM dealer in the late 70's and it holds up well. So opinions on different coatings will vary. When it dries it does not transfer and stay gooey like other aerosol under coatings I have seen and used. I sprayed many CUCV's and other vehicles with this stuff. I also sprayed under wood shed floors with it and it held up well. After seeing the rust on that floor area when it is cleaned up and Rusfre is applied you will be happy. It seals and protects. Take Care and Be Safe.
 

cucvrus

Well-known member
9,271
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113
Location
Jonestown Pennsylvania

I was reading into the posters message deeply and thought he had no means to apply the spray type so I recommended the brush on type. Either way it works well. That is as well as the area that is to be coated is properly prepped and cleaned. The top coating is only 1% of the finished product. 99% of the work goes into the proper cleanup, prep, and application. After all you can paint a turd but it won't last long. Just remember "Rust never sleeps and on a quiet night in Jonestown I can hear the CUCV's rusting at Fort Indiantown Gap. It's not as loud as it used to be but the sound is still there.
 

Keith_J

Well-known member
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Location
Schertz TX
Prep n Etch , a brand of phosphoric acid, from a pump up sprayer. Let it work until almost dry, then pressure wash. Repeat until bare. It is a good fertilizer so don't worry.
Once clean, then POR over the flash rust..roller or brush.
Top coat with frame paint.

This cleans off the grease too.

Patch panels from LMC Truck.
 

nyoffroad

Active member
572
58
28
Location
Rochester NY
View attachment 824452
Call this what you want but I have used it for over 40 years and have had great results. I started using it at the GM dealer in the late 70's and it holds up well. So opinions on different coatings will vary. When it dries it does not transfer and stay gooey like other aerosol under coatings I have seen and used. I sprayed many CUCV's and other vehicles with this stuff. I also sprayed under wood shed floors with it and it held up well. After seeing the rust on that floor area when it is cleaned up and Rusfre is applied you will be happy. It seals and protects. Take Care and Be Safe.
Love the Rusfre products, they also have an amber colored non drying product for inside doors, rockers, ectra that flows out great! When ever I replace doors I tape up the drain holes at the bottom and spray or pour some in the door and let set for a few minutes then turn on each side for a bit. It seeps into all the cracks between the door skin and the frame, just don't do this until AFTER painting! Great product at a very reasonable price
 

HelluvaEngineer

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
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Location
Atlanta, GA
That fender rust can only be repaired by welding. There are patch panels from Korea that are very affordable. I have used them and I lap the panels when I can get away with it, then seam seal the heck out of everything. The rust converter stuff is great and you can get it by the gallon online.

For the undercarriage shots, I would seriously consider wire brushing + a product called POR. It's not cheap, but it combines the rust conversion with a very tough paint. I've used it on problem areas before and been very impressed by it.

Any rust-through though - you have to weld it.
 

ldmack3

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
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Location
Idaho
The M35 has removable fenders. Mine were horrible rusted. I have spent weeks grinding, welding etc. Now that I'm getting close I figured out to take the internals out of my benchtop blast unit, and take them outside with a bucket of media to blast different areas of the frame and body easily. Perhaps you can do this on your 1009. There are so many options for treating, removing, encapsulating rust I really haven't decided which way I want to go. A buddy that has spent decades doing body and interior on 1950s cars swears by POR15. I'll let you know what I decide but think about using your blast gun and a bucket of media to do the underside if you can't pull the body.
 

1love

Member
64
36
18
Location
CA
Thank you all for taking the time to response I will add pictures once I receive my m1009 I'm still waiting for it that darn snow storm didn't help! Figured that I would have to weld that quater panel, anyone have one for sale?:alien:
 

1love

Member
64
36
18
Location
CA
That fender rust can only be repaired by welding. There are patch panels from Korea that are very affordable. I have used them and I lap the panels when I can get away with it, then seam seal the heck out of everything. The rust converter stuff is great and you can get it by the gallon online.

For the undercarriage shots, I would seriously consider wire brushing + a product called POR. It's not cheap, but it combines the rust conversion with a very tough paint. I've used it on problem areas before and been very impressed by it.

Any rust-through though - you have to weld it.



By chance do you have a link for that web site?
 

Keith_J

Well-known member
3,120
194
63
Location
Schertz TX
Lap seams can trap moisture, causing accelerated rusting. If you must lap, be sure to seal it well on the inside.
I match cut, fit up for minimum gap and use short interrupted back stitch welds. Take time to avoid heat buildup. And practice on scraps to adjust settings for full penetration
 
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