Usmc m1030b1

Bradyrw625

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I went ahead and installed the heat shields back onto the muffler. I cleaned and painted it with VHT high temp flat black paint. I put in a new header to muffler gasket, new heat shield hardware, and a new header to muffler clamp. I also put in a new OEM ignition. The Marines epoxied the key in. Probably a good idea so it doesn't get lost in the first five seconds. I also installed a JNS engineering kickstand foot pad.
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Another Ahab

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. I also put in a new OEM ignition. The Marines epoxied the key in. Probably a good idea so it doesn't get lost in the first five seconds. I also installed a JNS engineering kickstand foot pad.
Smart way to ensure it's NEVER getting lost.

Your work is a treat to look at, excellent!
 

glcaines

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I have an M1030M1 with the key epoxied in. I bought a new OEM switch like you, but once I found out what is involved in replacing the switch, I stuck with the epoxied key switch and went to a chain and padlock for security. You really do good work. I am very impressed!
 

Bradyrw625

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I dumped the oil, replaced the oil filter, and added an Eagle Mike low profile drain plug. Decided to do the doohickey and replaced the left side outer engine cover from an older engine. The spring was broken so I replaced it with an Eagle Mike lever and torsion spring. I also decided to change all of the engine hardware with stainless steel hex head bolts that I painted flat black. This will be a bit of a process. I’m going replace the right-side engine case and check the filter at the bottom over there as well.
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Bradyrw625

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I replaced all of the clutch fibers, clutch springs, water pump gasket, right case gasket. Then cleaned the oil screen (looked pretty good), threw on a Eagle mike oil fill plug, the shift linkage (elongated version), eagle mike low profile magnetic drain plug, and new oil filter. I replaced all the case, water pump, and oil filter hardware to 6mm hex head stainless using anti seize. I also checked the valve specs and one was out and the rest were pretty tight. I used a form I found online to track it and a webpage to do the math for me. I ordered all 4 valve shims from Eagle Mike. Once they arrive I’ll clean up the outside of the motor, install the valves, a new cam chain tensioner gasket ,and then engine will be done. From there I’ll start laying out the harness into the frame. I really want to get this done before July. This engine is unknown to me. It’s from a totaled 2004 KLR I got a few years ago. It had about 20,000 miles on it. With the dohickey, new valve shims, fresh oil and filters, it should be good to go for some time.
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Bradyrw625

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What brand torque wrench is that there, Bradyrw625?

I've never run across it. Do you like it?
It’s a craftsman digital one. It’s ok but the batteries are hard to find and pricey. With these bikes, you have to follow torque specs so having a easy to use torque wrench, and service manual, is a must. I think there’s better ones but it seems to work well. I’ve had to borrow a buddies a few times for anything over 80 foot pounds. But I also restored 4 of these in a storage locker so I can’t complain. I’ve got power, a stereo, lighting, a fan. It’s amazing now.
 

Another Ahab

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It’s a craftsman digital one.
I used to buy Craftsman Tools:

- Readily (and confidently)

But I'm officially in "Old Man" territory now (and that was 30 years ago).

The same confidence is not there any more.

Not saying "never", but just that it's more of a crapshoot now than then, you know?
 

Bradyrw625

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I used to buy Craftsman Tools:

- Readily (and confidently)

But I'm officially in "Old Man" territory now (and that was 30 years ago).

The same confidence is not there any more.

Not saying "never", but just that it's more of a crapshoot now than then, you know?
I agree but I didn't want to spend more then $100 on it. I use profits from the bike sales for more tools and to build other bikes. I'm in the midst of building 3 right now. Only 1 is a USMC bike.
 

Another Ahab

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I agree but I didn't want to spend more then $100 on it. I use profits from the bike sales for more tools and to build other bikes. I'm in the midst of building 3 right now. Only 1 is a USMC bike.
I get that completely:

- You need a tool that's going to be good for one year (maybe two)?

- Not looking to buy that lifetime tool (with the corresponding price tag)?

Craftsman is a good bet!
 

Mainsail

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Puget Sound, WA
I have three torque wrenches, all are craftsman.

Two are still unused after five or six years of ownership. I took them to work and put them on the torque reader, and both were so far off I consider them unusable.

The oldest one I have tested about 10# off at 100 foot/pounds. That one is used mostly for torqueing my aluminum wheels on the jeep.

I still haven't found an economical solution to having them professionally calibrated.
 
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