Fire Extinguisher

SandM1010

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Franklin/MA
Does anyone know what's inside the fire extinguishers that were used in the CUCV trucks? Are they safe to still have in the truck? I have 2 that were in my M1010. Both appeared to be filled with a liquid and seem full, there's no gauge. Curious if they could have become hazardous over time. thanks I will Take a photo soon and post.
 

D6T

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Are you sure they are fire extinguishers and not DS2 sprayers?

The decon spray bottle would contain DS2, which is caustic, I forgot if it’s closer to hypochloric acid or bleach.

(Neat fact that most people would never guess: instead of a pull pin to secure the handle against accidental discharge, the spray bottle has a lead plug that’s intended for the user to just squeeze the handle through in order to use it.)

A fire extinguisher contents may possibly be determined by its appearance. A label with the NFPA classification may or may not be present.

A red body with a hose or short barrel likely indicates water or dry chemical.

A rigid “horn” that swivels is for CO2.

A small silver body and metal hardware, with a short hose or barrel, is likely “purple K” for grease fires and combustible cooking by-products—found in kitchens but not CUCVs!

A larger silver body and hose is likely water, a neat can to have around as you can fill it with water and pressurize with a common air pump.

This has been your daily lesson in such things, brought to you by someone who’s been in both NBC and firefighter roles.
 
Last edited:

Crazyguyla

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Hawthorne, FL
Are you sure they are fire extinguishers and not DS2 sprayers?

The decon spray bottle would contain DS2, which is caustic, I forgot if it’s closer to hypochloric acid or bleach.

(Neat fact that most people would never guess: instead of a pull pin to secure the handle against accidental discharge, the spray bottle has a lead plug that’s intended for the user to just squeeze the handle through in order to use it.)

A fire extinguisher contents may possibly be determined by its appearance. A label with the NFPA classification may or may not be present.

A red body with a hose or short barrel likely indicates water or dry chemical.

A rigid “horn” that swivels is for CO2.

A small silver body and metal hardware, with a short hose or barrel, is likely “purple K” for grease fires and combustible cooking by-products—found in kitchens but not CUCVs!

A larger silver body and hose is likely water, a neat can to have around as you can fill it with water and pressurize with a common air pump.

This has been your daily lesson in such things, brought to you by someone who’s been in both NBC and firefighter roles.
DS 2 is its own corrosive nightmare. I remember packing leaking canisters in vermiculite. DS2 and bleach, big bad fire..
 

jasonjc

Well-known member
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Location
Gravette Ar.
Are you sure they are fire extinguishers and not DS2 sprayers?

The decon spray bottle would contain DS2, which is caustic, I forgot if it’s closer to hypochloric acid or bleach.

(Neat fact that most people would never guess: instead of a pull pin to secure the handle against accidental discharge, the spray bottle has a lead plug that’s intended for the user to just squeeze the handle through in order to use it.)

A fire extinguisher contents may possibly be determined by its appearance. A label with the NFPA classification may or may not be present.

A red body with a hose or short barrel likely indicates water or dry chemical.

A rigid “horn” that swivels is for CO2.

A small silver body and metal hardware, with a short hose or barrel, is likely “purple K” for grease fires and combustible cooking by-products—found in kitchens but not CUCVs!

A larger silver body and hose is likely water, a neat can to have around as you can fill it with water and pressurize with a common air pump.

This has been your daily lesson in such things, brought to you by someone who’s been in both NBC and firefighter roles.


Purple K is for fuel fires and would or could be in a CUCV. Now a "class K" fire extinguisher is more for use in a kitchen.
 

Mullaney

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Charlotte NC
i looked closer at the label on the second one, its CF3BR Halon.
.
Halon is the good stuff. We have about a dozen of them posted around our computer equipment. Still need to disconnect the power to stop the fire - but Halon is the thing to use to extinguish fire in a computer cabinet. It doesn't make the gosh awful white powder mess like the "ABC" dry chemical extinguisher. AND you can still breathe after using Halon too...
 

Elijah95

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Steel Soldiers Supporter
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Georgia
.
Halon is the good stuff. We have about a dozen of them posted around our computer equipment. Still need to disconnect the power to stop the fire - but Halon is the thing to use to extinguish fire in a computer cabinet. It doesn't make the gosh awful white powder mess like the "ABC" dry chemical extinguisher. AND you can still breathe after using Halon too...
Funny story, had a co worker set off the halon charge in a massive server room. We both nearly suffocated before we made it out. Good times


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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