What did you do to your deuce this week?

RedNBlue

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Lovettsville, Virginia
.
Good Deal!!

That solid state flasher will give you the opportunity to have LED lights that flash properly.
Suggest that you change the bulbs and test function one by one rather than swapping everything all at once...

Glad it solved your problems too!
Thanks! That is exactly how I've been diagnosing and tracking things down. The original turn/tail/brake lights work fine, but the previous owner removed the front turn signals and put halogen KC lights in their place. He had replaced the headlights with LEDs that have a daytime running light function and flash amber for turn signals. They work and the beam pattern is definitely better than stock (also better than my 2002 F-250) so I'll leave them for now. The KC lights are coming off and my intention is to put the correct lights back for the turn signals; I know the LEDs are much more expensive, but I'm considering them and maybe replacing the rears with updated LEDs also. The truck isn't going to be completely original, and I like LED lights over halogen/incandescent for several reasons, but part of me likes original parts that work and wants to keep them original. Originals are also less than 1/3 the cost of LED.
 

98G

Former SSG
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AZ/KS/MO/OK, varies by the day...
Thanks! That is exactly how I've been diagnosing and tracking things down. The original turn/tail/brake lights work fine, but the previous owner removed the front turn signals and put halogen KC lights in their place. He had replaced the headlights with LEDs that have a daytime running light function and flash amber for turn signals. They work and the beam pattern is definitely better than stock (also better than my 2002 F-250) so I'll leave them for now. The KC lights are coming off and my intention is to put the correct lights back for the turn signals; I know the LEDs are much more expensive, but I'm considering them and maybe replacing the rears with updated LEDs also. The truck isn't going to be completely original, and I like LED lights over halogen/incandescent for several reasons, but part of me likes original parts that work and wants to keep them original. Originals are also less than 1/3 the cost of LED.
Are your LED headlights like these , except with an illuminated outer ring?
 

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RedNBlue

Member
18
57
13
Location
Lovettsville, Virginia
Are your LED headlights like these , except with an illuminated outer ring?
Not quite. Those are very similar to what I have on my Harley though, very good lights! The ones on my deuce are LED with a single projector lens with several rings of leds on the outside, white for running lights and sequential amber for turn. I finally found them online by Auxbeam.
1_76ad53ae-7dae-48a4-8e15-bce2b88148cd_1024x1024.jpg
 

TheQuaker

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Over Memorial Day Weekend I did some maintenance on the right front of the old girl.

She got new axle and hub seals, a new boot, a bearing inspection/service and a brake inspection/service (ended up replacing the wheel cylinder as well). Got her all buttoned back up, brakes bled and back in service.

Since I had the wheel/tire off already for a couple of days to do all the other work, I took advantage of the open access and finally cleaned/prepped the wheel well area (scraped off the remaining peeling post-factory asphalt-based rustproofing garbage they sprayed everywhere) and got everything all painted back up in her factory 23070 semi-gloss OD...

IMG_2940.JPG
 

cattlerepairman

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Just to prove that no good deed goes unpunished; in the course of the storm cleanup the community association asked me if I could remove the remains of a 1930' Chevrolet from the woods. The car was abandoned there some 50 years ago and has since collapsed and parts were salvaged extensively. The headlights disappeared only last year.

Access to within winching range is via a small path. Lola navigated that without issues...but....the operator decided to turn the front end towards the winching target to reduce angle. That caused the front end to go onto soft, sandy ground. I winched the car out of its grave and close to the truck but, alas, Lola would not move.

IMG-20220604-WA0007.jpeg
This is actually an incline, the truck's rear end facing uphill. The collapsed remains of the Chevy are to the right, in front of my truck. The remains are the relatively intact frame and folded-in body structure.

IMG-20220604-WA0010.jpeg

IMG_2315.jpg
This is an incline leading downhill to the truck. The truck's rear end is pointing uphill.

The only way out was downhill (wreck in the way). She would not go backwards (uphill). I dug the wheels out. Still would not go. So, I made "the call" and a fellow firefighter showed up with our F-550 Brush Truck and a broad grin on his face.

That grin disappeared quickly when he buried the brush truck in the sand (but it was on an incline so we got it out quickly). With the WARN 9500 electric winch of the BT and a snatch block, Lola came out of her predicament.

Of course, that was also when the "spool in" solenoid of the WARN winch decided to give it up. We had a few tough winch recoveries lately, so I am sure that there was lingering "fried-ness" already. This pull to get Lola out was relatively benign. Electric winches are great - but also finicky (in my personal opinion). They have a tendency to quit when you really need them.

Got Lola out of the way and the BT pulled the car wreck out to the road. I got my truck turned around and out of the woods as well without any damage, just slightly dented pride.


The inability to easily thread the winch cable out through the back is a severe design flaw of the M35. I had a perfect anchor point behind the truck and could have winched myself backwards in minutes. The newer trucks, with a mid-mounted winch between the frame rails, do have a decisive advantage in these situations!

I know...in dire straits one can run the winch cable down around the bumper and out the back....likely damaging the wire rope and/or truck components in the process, but this was not a life or death recovery situation. So, I did hold my horses on this.

Not sure if lockers would have helped; maybe, maybe not. The ground was simply softer than expected and 6 tons badly distributed (most weight on the front axle) is not a great start.


All of this to show that Murphy was alive and well on this one.

Any activity imagined to unfold in a simple, easy manner, when commencing, will immediately become complicated to the maximum extent possible.
 
Last edited:

Crazyguyla

Active member
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Altus, OK
Just to prove that no good deed goes unpunished; in the course of the storm cleanup the community association asked me if I could remove the remains of a 1930' Chevrolet from the woods. The car was abandoned there some 50 years ago and has since collapsed and parts were salvaged extensively. The headlights disappeared only last year.

Access to within winching range is via a small path. Lola navigated that without issues...but....the operator decided to turn the front end towards the winching target to reduce angle. That caused the front end to go onto soft, sandy ground. I winched the car out of its grave and close to the truck but, alas, Lola would not move.

View attachment 869695
This is actually an incline, the truck's rear end facing uphill. The collapsed remains of the Chevy are to the right, in front of my truck. The remains are the relatively intact frame and folded-in body structure.

View attachment 869696

View attachment 869697
This is an incline leading downhill to the truck. The truck's rear end is pointing uphill.

The only way out was downhill (wreck in the way). She would not go backwards (uphill). I dug the wheels out. Still would not go. So, I made "the call" and a fellow firefighter showed up with our F-550 Brush Truck and a broad grin on his face.

That grin disappeared quickly when he buried the brush truck in the sand (but it was on an incline so we got it out quickly). With the WARN 9500 electric winch of the BT and a snatch block, Lola came out of her predicament.

Of course, that was also when the "spool in" solenoid of the WARN winch decided to give it up. We had a few tough winch recoveries lately, so I am sure that there was lingering "fried-ness" already. This pull to get Lola out was relatively benign. Electric winches are great - but also finicky (in my personal opinion). They have a tendency to quit when you really need them.

Got Lola out of the way and the BT pulled the car wreck out to the road. I got my truck turned around and out of the woods as well without any damage, just slightly dented pride.


The inability to easily thread the winch cable out through the back is a severe design flaw of the M35. I had a perfect anchor point behind the truck and could have winched myself backwards in minutes. The newer trucks, with a mid-mounted winch between the frame rails, do have a decisive advantage in these situations!

I know...in dire straits one can run the winch cable down around the bumper and out the back....likely damaging the wire rope and/or truck components in the process, but this was not a life or death recovery situation. So, I did hold my horses on this.

Not sure if lockers would have helped; maybe, maybe not. The ground was simply softer than expected and 6 tons badly distributed (most weight on the front axle) is not a great start.


All of this to show that Murphy was alive and well on this one.

Any activity imagined to unfold in a simple, easy manner, when commencing, will immediately become complicated to the maximum extent possible.
There's a manu
Just to prove that no good deed goes unpunished; in the course of the storm cleanup the community association asked me if I could remove the remains of a 1930' Chevrolet from the woods. The car was abandoned there some 50 years ago and has since collapsed and parts were salvaged extensively. The headlights disappeared only last year.

Access to within winching range is via a small path. Lola navigated that without issues...but....the operator decided to turn the front end towards the winching target to reduce angle. That caused the front end to go onto soft, sandy ground. I winched the car out of its grave and close to the truck but, alas, Lola would not move.

View attachment 869695
This is actually an incline, the truck's rear end facing uphill. The collapsed remains of the Chevy are to the right, in front of my truck. The remains are the relatively intact frame and folded-in body structure.

View attachment 869696

View attachment 869697
This is an incline leading downhill to the truck. The truck's rear end is pointing uphill.

The only way out was downhill (wreck in the way). She would not go backwards (uphill). I dug the wheels out. Still would not go. So, I made "the call" and a fellow firefighter showed up with our F-550 Brush Truck and a broad grin on his face.

That grin disappeared quickly when he buried the brush truck in the sand (but it was on an incline so we got it out quickly). With the WARN 9500 electric winch of the BT and a snatch block, Lola came out of her predicament.

Of course, that was also when the "spool in" solenoid of the WARN winch decided to give it up. We had a few tough winch recoveries lately, so I am sure that there was lingering "fried-ness" already. This pull to get Lola out was relatively benign. Electric winches are great - but also finicky (in my personal opinion). They have a tendency to quit when you really need them.

Got Lola out of the way and the BT pulled the car wreck out to the road. I got my truck turned around and out of the woods as well without any damage, just slightly dented pride.


The inability to easily thread the winch cable out through the back is a severe design flaw of the M35. I had a perfect anchor point behind the truck and could have winched myself backwards in minutes. The newer trucks, with a mid-mounted winch between the frame rails, do have a decisive advantage in these situations!

I know...in dire straits one can run the winch cable down around the bumper and out the back....likely damaging the wire rope and/or truck components in the process, but this was not a life or death recovery situation. So, I did hold my horses on this.

Not sure if lockers would have helped; maybe, maybe not. The ground was simply softer than expected and 6 tons badly distributed (most weight on the front axle) is not a great start.


All of this to show that Murphy was alive and well on this one.

Any activity imagined to unfold in a simple, easy manner, when commencing, will immediately become complicated to the maximum extent possible.
You can anchor a line between the rear dual tires and use the rims act like a winch..
 

ToddJK

Well-known member
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Location
Sparta, MI
Yes, the " three snatchblocks" is the issue! Very good technique. I usually carry one snatchblock.....
I have to admit, what you said about the M35's winch set up, you're right, it's not as easy to work with as traditional winch set ups on most trucks, but it does require, imo, 2 people, more gear, practice, and muscle, too to do this effectively.
 
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