Bought an M35A2, with a unique addition

M37M35

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As for my truck, I can see the holes drilled into the frame between the cab and the bed, which implies this crane has been mounted before, so I THINK I’m good there.
These are the holes drilled in the frame on mine. They’re horizontal, and on both sides.
Do you have any better pictures of both the driver and passenger side?

I still think that colored area on the drivers side with the 4 holes is for the spare tire mount.
20200513_150210.jpg


I watched your video on page two and it's not good enough to tell for sure about the holes. I can see that your fuel tank is not in the stock location. It's been moved to the rear, and I can see the area where the tank supports used to be. That might be the holes you're seeing. Better pictures would tell for sure.

My crane actually isn't bolted to the frame at all. It has braces above and below the frame, and is clamped on with large U-bolts.

You can see the location of the spare tire mount, and the crane mounting in the above picture.
 

Danspomer

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Do you have any better pictures of both the driver and passenger side?

I still think that colored area on the drivers side with the 4 holes is for the spare tire mount.
View attachment 840526

I watched your video on page two and it's not good enough to tell for sure about the holes. I can see that your fuel tank is not in the stock location. It's been moved to the rear, and I can see the area where the tank supports used to be. That might be the holes you're seeing. Better pictures would tell for sure.

My crane actually isn't bolted to the frame at all. It has braces above and below the frame, and is clamped on with large U-bolts.

You can see the location of the spare tire mount, and the crane mounting in the above picture.
You know, looking more closely, I believe you’re right about the braces above and below, attached with U bolts. I hadn’t really thought about it, but that makes a lot of sense.

I don’t have any better pics at present, but when I head down there this week, I’ll pay much more attention to that possible configuration. Thanks for the heads up!

So… what powers your crane?
 

M37M35

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Unless I’m misidentifying them, the PTOs on the truck are mounted fore and aft on the diffs.
If you're talking about the flanges on the front and rear differentials, those are attached to your drivelines and only turn when you're driving the truck. You can't power any accessories off of those.

I did see that you have a front winch. If it's complete and functional, you'll have a PTO on the drivers side of the transmission with a shaft that runs forward and is connected to the winch. There should be a shift lever on the floor in front of the drivers seat to control the winch PTO.

That winch PTO can have an accessory drive PTO bolted to the back of it that points to the rear. You can then run a shaft from it to a hydraulic pump to power the crane. That's how mine is powered.

You'll need to crawl under it and look at your transmission and transfer case and see what PTOs you have. There's also a PTO that mounts to the transfer case, but they're somewhat rare.

Next time you're there, take LOTS of detailed pictures and video of EVERYTHING you might have questions about. It makes this process a lot easier.


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20200502_163120.jpg
 

Danspomer

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If you're talking about the flanges on the front and rear differentials, those are attached to your drivelines and only turn when you're driving the truck. You can't power any accessories off of those.

I did see that you have a front winch. If it's complete and functional, you'll have a PTO on the drivers side of the transmission with a shaft that runs forward and is connected to the winch. There should be a shift lever on the floor in front of the drivers seat to control the winch PTO.

That winch PTO can have an accessory drive PTO bolted to the back of it that points to the rear. You can then run a shaft from it to a hydraulic pump to power the crane. That's how mine is powered.

You'll need to crawl under it and look at your transmission and transfer case and see what PTOs you have. There's also a PTO that mounts to the transfer case, but they're somewhat rare.

Next time you're there, take LOTS of detailed pictures and video of EVERYTHING you might have questions about. It makes this process a lot easier.


View attachment 840529
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Im on it! I’ll be down there this week!
 

Danspomer

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Im on it! I’ll be down there this week!
Also, can someone explain to me why my truck has manual lock out hubs on the front wheels? Don’t they serve the same purpose as the “front axle engage” switch on the dash? They seem extemporaneous.

What am I missing?
 

cattlerepairman

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Also, can someone explain to me why my truck has manual lock out hubs on the front wheels? Don’t they serve the same purpose as the “front axle engage” switch on the dash? They seem extemporaneous.

What am I missing?
You are missing the fact that, while the air operated dash switch causes the transfer case to disengage the front driveline, the front wheels during regular driving will still turn the front axle shafts, front diff and front driveshaft. This is because the front wheel hubs are permanently locked to the front axle shafts. This creates parasitic drag and unnecessary wear on the front drive components. It also causes additional forces on the steering wheel and a slightly wider turning radius.

A simple lockout hub prevents this by uncoupling the wheel hub from the axle shaft. Now only the front wheels spin and the front driveline doesn't.

Front lockout hubs are a worthwhile upgrade for a truck that sees a lot of pavement. Other than having to remember to engage them before heading off road, there are not really any drawbacks.

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:

Phoenix77

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I compromised and bought a 2k lb capacity jib crane and a 2,400 lb capacity 12v winch to mount to it that I'll get a base adapter fabricated and welded to so I can relocate it around the bed of an LMTV in the inserts for such.

Still working on my M-1081 restomod project, but will get around to that part by Fall-ish 🤞
 

Danspomer

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You are missing the fact that, while the air operated dash switch causes the transfer case to disengage the front driveline, the front wheels during regular driving will still turn the front axle shafts, front diff and front driveshaft. This is because the front wheel hubs are permanently locked to the front axle shafts. This creates parasitic drag and unnecessary wear on the front drive components. It also causes additional forces on the steering wheel and a slightly wider turning radius.

A simple lockout hub prevents this by uncoupling the wheel hub from the axle shaft. Now only the front wheels spin and the front driveline doesn't.

Front lockout hubs are a worthwhile upgrade for a truck that sees a lot of pavement. Other than having to remember to engage them before heading off road, there are not really any drawbacks.

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
At last! I understand!
 

Danspomer

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Location
Colorado
If you're talking about the flanges on the front and rear differentials, those are attached to your drivelines and only turn when you're driving the truck. You can't power any accessories off of those.

I did see that you have a front winch. If it's complete and functional, you'll have a PTO on the drivers side of the transmission with a shaft that runs forward and is connected to the winch. There should be a shift lever on the floor in front of the drivers seat to control the winch PTO.

That winch PTO can have an accessory drive PTO bolted to the back of it that points to the rear. You can then run a shaft from it to a hydraulic pump to power the crane. That's how mine is powered.

You'll need to crawl under it and look at your transmission and transfer case and see what PTOs you have. There's also a PTO that mounts to the transfer case, but they're somewhat rare.

Next time you're there, take LOTS of detailed pictures and video of EVERYTHING you might have questions about. It makes this process a lot easier.


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View attachment 840528
Well, I certainly DO have the front shaft on the PTO, and it looks like I have *something* coming out of the rear of the PTO. I also have a smaller driveshaft resembling the one in your photo lying in the cab of the truck. Pic attached…

7D515D42-FDEA-4568-8968-6115A4D98893.jpeg
 

M37M35

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East Central Oklahoma
Well, I certainly DO have the front shaft on the PTO, and it looks like I have *something* coming out of the rear of the PTO. I also have a smaller driveshaft resembling the one in your photo lying in the cab of the truck. Pic attached…

View attachment 840747
Well it looks like you do have the rear facing accessory PTO, and maybe a driveshaft to fit it. That gets you a few steps closer.
Do you have a hydraulic pump?
 

Danspomer

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Well it looks like you do have the rear facing accessory PTO, and maybe a driveshaft to fit it. That gets you a few steps closer.
Do you have a hydraulic pump?
An excellent question, and the answer is: I think so. I have a few covered and sealed “packages” in the bed that I thought would be unwise to cover because of the elements.

Shes going in for a complete walkthrough in the next week or two. I have a truck shop ready to do the once over and inspection, then a machine shop a few blocks away to install the crane.

I need “eyes on” from folks that do this stuff regularly, in a controlled environment. It’s very hard to do meaningful assessments or work in a patchy meadow 7700’ up in the Rockies with cows, bears and rattlers always on your mind.
 

Mullaney

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An excellent question, and the answer is: I think so. I have a few covered and sealed “packages” in the bed that I thought would be unwise to cover because of the elements.

Shes going in for a complete walkthrough in the next week or two. I have a truck shop ready to do the once over and inspection, then a machine shop a few blocks away to install the crane.

I need “eyes on” from folks that do this stuff regularly, in a controlled environment. It’s very hard to do meaningful assessments or work in a patchy meadow 7700’ up in the Rockies with cows, bears and rattlers always on your mind.
.
Need to think about supplying hydraulic fluid to the pump.
You don't want to engage the PTO driving the rear pump without fluid.
Lack of oil will overheat the pump vanes (burn them up!) in under a minute.
Wet is good for sure!

You will need something to hold (guessing) at least 10 gallons of oil.
Having that tank with you to have the crane mounted will get you closer to operational...
(unless it is already in the base of the machine)
 

Danspomer

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Colorado
.
Need to think about supplying hydraulic fluid to the pump.
You don't want to engage the PTO driving the rear pump without fluid.
Lack of oil will overheat the pump vanes (burn them up!) in under a minute.
Wet is good for sure!

You will need something to hold (guessing) at least 10 gallons of oil.
Having that tank with you to have the crane mounted will get you closer to operational...
(unless it is already in the base of the machine)
Like I said, I need a slightly more sterile environment to assess this thing, although to be honest, she loves guarding our property, just sitting there.

I’m feeling pretty happy that we bought it and have it stashed on our property for now.

But I have plans. She’ll be well taken care of. Started right up today, and happy to run. 😉
 

Mullaney

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Like I said, I need a slightly more sterile environment to assess this thing, although to be honest, she loves guarding our property, just sitting there.

I’m feeling pretty happy that we bought it and have it stashed on our property for now.

But I have plans. She’ll be well taken care of. Started right up today, and happy to run. 😉
.
These big trucks are a real adventure. To be completely honest, it is even fun to go outside on a cool rainy day and just sit there.

I just did a quick WebSearch and found a MV Club in Colorado called the Military Vehicle Collectors of Colorado (MVCC) .
You might find truck-minded folks there.
 

Danspomer

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Colorado
.
These big trucks are a real adventure. To be completely honest, it is even fun to go outside on a cool rainy day and just sit there.

I just did a quick WebSearch and found a MV Club in Colorado called the Military Vehicle Collectors of Colorado (MVCC) .
You might find truck-minded folks there.
Thanks, pal.

I know of one other truck in the local area- a bobbed deuce. I’ve tried to make contact, but no luck yet.

However, it will happen.😉
 

Danspomer

Active member
87
114
33
Location
Colorado
If you're talking about the flanges on the front and rear differentials, those are attached to your drivelines and only turn when you're driving the truck. You can't power any accessories off of those.

I did see that you have a front winch. If it's complete and functional, you'll have a PTO on the drivers side of the transmission with a shaft that runs forward and is connected to the winch. There should be a shift lever on the floor in front of the drivers seat to control the winch PTO.

That winch PTO can have an accessory drive PTO bolted to the back of it that points to the rear. You can then run a shaft from it to a hydraulic pump to power the crane. That's how mine is powered.

You'll need to crawl under it and look at your transmission and transfer case and see what PTOs you have. There's also a PTO that mounts to the transfer case, but they're somewhat rare.

Next time you're there, take LOTS of detailed pictures and video of EVERYTHING you might have questions about. It makes this process a lot easier.


View attachment 840529
View attachment 840530
View attachment 840531
View attachment 840532
View attachment 840527
View attachment 840528
So.. speaking of those “flanges” that come out of the differentials, what are they used for?

I have spent a lot of time trying to think of uses, but can think of none. However, I’m sure the military will prove me wrong.
 
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